Defibrillators on Campus

Defibrillators installed on campus

Lifesaving defibrillators installed on Campus

17 new locations have been identified for the installation of lifesaving defibrillators across the University Campus. This is part of the University’s on-going commitment to improve health and safety provision on campus for staff, students and the wider local community, and now takes the provision of defibrillators on campus to 30. The new locations are detailed below and have been added to the campus map (click on the facilities tab) making it easier for anyone to locate their nearest defibrillator location.

  • Reception in CAPE
  • Outside Roger Stevens
  • Outside the Facilities Directorate building
  • Outside the multi-storey car park
  • Outside the Psychology building
  • Outside Pure Café, level 9 in Worsley
  • Miall reception
  • Conference Auditorium
  • In the reception areas of Charles Morris
  • In the reception area of Central Village
  • In the reception area of Devonshire Hall
  • Outside Fairbairn House Clarendon Road
Defibrillators in the following locations will be installed in the coming months.
  • In the courtyard of Clothworkers Court
  • In the reception area of Sir William Henry Bragg Building
  • In the reception area of NEXUS
  • Outside the reception area of Henry Price
  • Sports Park Weetwood to cover pitches and public access areas

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of premature death. SCA occurs because the electrical rhythm that controls the heart is interrupted. A defibrillator is a device that gives a high energy electric shock to the heart through the chest walls to someone who is in cardiac arrest. This high energy shock is called defibrillation. The quicker the patient can be given shocks in combination with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the greater the chance of successful resuscitation.

Defibrillators are easy to use and are very effective. They are designed to be used by anyone so training is not required. A defibrillator unit will issue verbal instructions and guide the user through its use. The units will not issue a shock unless the heart requires it – therefore they are safe to use and cannot be used on someone who is not experiencing SCA. Additionally, the units themselves require very little routine maintenance.

If you are faced with an emergency follow these steps:

  1. Call the University Security Services Team on 0113 343 2222 and Emergency Services on 999.
  2. Follow their instructions, they will give you the code to open the external Defibrillator cabinet. Internal cabinets have no locks fitted and can be accessed directly in the event of an emergency but Security Services MUST also be called.
  3. Seek help from another person to commence cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) while the defibrillator is obtained. If you are alone, commence CPR if confident to do so, and await the arrival of Security Services.
  4. Follow the instructions on how to use the defibrillator, a colleague from Security Services will arrive to assist at the scene.

Dennis Hopper, Director Campus Development said: “Strengthening the provision of defibrillators and increasing their accessibility across campus is a major step forward for the University. They have been located in publicly accessible areas of all large multi-floor buildings, and externally across campus which are easily accessible for all other buildings. They are bright and noticeable which makes them easy to identify in an emergency. I’d advise staff and students, if they see a defibrillator located on campus, to stop a moment and familiarise themselves with the instructions printed on the outside casing.

“We are grateful for the partnership with Yorkshire Ambulance Service, who have been highly supportive of our ambition to increase the number of defibrillators across the campus. The Service advised us on how best to proceed in terms of the distribution of the defibrillators across campus to ensure that all areas were covered and that travel times to access a defibrillator were kept to an acceptable reasonable minimum. We have registered the defibrillators on the NHS regional database, which means, when the ambulance service is contacted in an emergency, they are able to immediately inform the caller of the nearest defibrillator unit.”

Learn how to perform CPR and AED

If you are interested in training to perform CPR and use automated defibrillators go along to the Restart a Heart Day event, hosted by Leeds Medical Students, on 10 October outside Leeds University Union.

This is a voluntary group of 40 Leeds medical students who are trained by Yorkshire Ambulance Service as Community First Responders (CFRs). The group aims to have a pair on-call close to 24/7 to then be dispatched to high priority 999 calls in the local area ahead of ambulance crews. The group is also increasingly involved in outreach and education, both on and off campus. At the event, staff and students will be taught how to perform CPR and use an AED

Roger Stevent Cooling pond

Exciting improvement plans for the Roger Stevens Cooling Pond

Work has begun at the Roger Stevens cooling pond as part of a multi-disciplinary University project, that will not only visually enhance the landscape outside the Roger Stevens Building, but will also provide research led teaching opportunities for our students.

This innovative project has been led by Estates Services and has involved The Leeds Living Lab, in collaboration with colleagues from University–wide departments including, Sustainability, and Schools of Biology, Geography and Civil Engineering. Teams worked together to co-create a solution for the Roger Stevens pond that enhances amenity value, enhances biodiversity, improves natural water quality, reduces operational cost and provides an innovative space for interdisciplinary, research-led teaching.

The installation of sensors within the pool will also provide live data on water quality and a variety of environmental parameters, this will be made available to staff and students for teaching and research use.

Roger Stevens pond

Leonard Wilson, Deputy Director for Estates Services commented:“The scheme has been designed to create an extra ‘green’ dimension to this part of the campus and help biodiversity in the area. Once the planting has been established and the neutrality of the water is in balance, it is also hoped to introduce fish to the pond.The duck house will also continue to remain at the pond side, and we envisage they too will benefit from the new improved environment.  This year we had two broods, which have now flown south, but we look forward to welcoming them back in the spring when the pool will be more established and flourishing.”

The Leeds Living Lab drives the University’s commitment to embedding sustainability through knowledge, engagement, collaboration and innovation. It brings together students, academic and operational staff to research and test sustainable solutions, enhance our curriculum and solve real world challenges using the University as a test-bed.

A Living Lab Placement Student in the School of Biology, will ensure that staff and students can access to data for teaching and research use. It also seeks to be a centre of academic research such as a recently started study into the effects of the water body on the heat island effect of the surrounding architecture.

With connections to Undergraduate and Postgraduate teaching modules in all the Schools involved, the collaborative approach has sought to ensure the pond can meet the demands of student assessed projects, field practice and dissertations whilst also delivering an innovative, sustainable solution as part of the University Landscape Strategy.

 

Pyramid theatre

New look Theatre

Disruptions featured image

Closure of lift on Level 6 in EC Stoner

From Friday 2 June until Friday 27 October 2017 we will be refurbishing the area between rooms 6.74a to 6.62 on Level 6, to form the new IT Cluster.

 

As part of the work this means there will be no access to lift 48 on Level 6. This lift will travel between Level 7 – Level 11 only, during the construction period.

This work is to accommodate the planned £7.5m investment for the School of Earth and Environment to create multi–disciplinary meeting and teaching spaces for staff and PhD students.

For staff, students and visitors this will mean:

  • Using alternative lifts 46 and 181, as indicated on the map.
  • Using the most accessible route from the south side/MSCP which would be to enter Roger Stevens via the ramp at L7, take the lift to L10 Red Route and make your way to EC Stoner to use one of the lifts (46, 48 and 181) to get to your place of work.
  • Please note that Lift 181 is only accessible from L7

Read full lift notice (opens new PDF)

Thank you for your cooperation and we apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Should you require any further information please do not hesitate to contact Paul Cook on p.s.cook@leeds.ac.uk or the Estates Helpdesk on 0113 34 35491

 

Campus then and now

Campus then and now: Roger Stevens Building

We’ve been digging through our archive of old campus photos and found a few images that show the campus throughout the years. This month we’re focussing on the Roger Stevens Building.

Then: Original design for Roger Stevens 

The original design for the Roger Stevens was very different from the final lecture theatre, as can be seen in the architecture’s mock-up above! 

The Roger Stevens Building seems to be a bit of a marmite building – people either love it or hate it.

Completed in 1970, the building was designed in the brutalist style by Chamberlin, Powell and Bon, which was fashionable between the 50’s and 70’s – as demonstrated in a number of buildings around Leeds – and was actually meant to form just a small part of the wider campus plan, which unfortunately (if you love the style like we do) never came to full fruition due to financial restraints. This blog by Tina Richardson, Lecturer at the School of Design, provides a fascinating insight into the building and its history, gave us the interesting fact that the basement was home to a broadcasting studio.

 

 

Now: Roger Stevens Building (2017)

It is host to 25 lecture theatres offering a range of capacities, including some of the newest and most innovative spaces on campus. It is also home of the Print & Copy Bureau, the one stop shop for all printing, copying, artwork preparation and mailing services at the university.

But our favourite residents are the Mallard ducks which nest in the surrounding undergrowth and use the ornamental pond (which was once used in the air conditioning system for the building – just don’t ask us how!).

It’s also featured in Meet in Leeds Venue of the Month!

Ryan Johnson 

Share your thoughts

If you have any past stories about Roger Stevens Building let us know!
Tweet us your throwback images and stories to  @UoLCampusDev #UoLThrowback

 

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