Parkinson Building

Creating a campus for everyone

A key aim for the University is to have a campus that is accessible for everyone.

The Facilities Directorate has been working hard to improve the accessibility of existing areas of campus, as well as to make equality of access a top consideration in the planning of new buildings.

In light of #DisabilityHistoryMonth we thought that this would be a great opportunity to showcase the accessibility works that have taken place across campus over the past years.

Discovery Way opens up campus

The completion of Nexus on the eastern edge of the University has opened up a new accessible route onto campus. The Discovery Way entrance is located on Woodhouse Lane, and provides a step-free route to the Orange Zone car park and E C Stoner Building, and from there to The Edge, Roger Stevens, Chancellor’s Court and beyond.

Nexus Discovery Way

Chemistry lift completed

The new lift in the School of Chemistry has now been completed, providing an accessible route to lecture theatres A and B.

Accessible water fountain fitted

A bespoke-designed water fountain has been installed on the Precinct. The fountain has two water spouts, one of which is positioned so that it is easily accessible for wheelchair users. Fill up your water bottle there and help with the University’s #2023PlasticFree Pledge!

Campus map updated with new defibrillators

The interactive campus map has been updated to show the locations of new defibrillators which have been fitted at Henry Price, Nexus and in Clothworker’s Court.

Further improvements to external steps on campus

There have been further improvements made to external steps across campus. Handrails have been fitted on the steps under the Roger Stevens Building leading to the Astbury Centre and on the steps leading down to the Edward Boyle Library from the Social Sciences Building. The steps have been lined with yellow paint to further improve campus accessibility.

Edward Boyle Steps

Ensuring digital accessibility for all

In response to new legislation setting a higher expectation for digital accessibility, the University has been taking steps to recognise where accessibility can be improved across our digital estate. An accessibility statement has been published on the University’s corporate website explaining which areas of the estate are not yet fully accessible, and how we plan to improve their accessibility.
The University has also engaged a third-party auditor to test our websites’ compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. Following on from this the University Communications team is running awareness sessions for relevant staff across the University to explain what is needed to improve our accessibility further.

Makeover for University’s main entrance

A large project to improve the look and general accessibility around the main entrance to the University has now been completed. Previously the area where the Michael Sadler Building meets the side of the Parkinson Building had sloping feathered steps on one side, and uneven ground without a clear pathway on the other. These feathered steps have been removed and replaced with a green area featuring a newly planted semi-mature tree. On the other side, the seating area has been redone with more attractive furniture, improved landscaping and clear accessible routes to allow easy access from Woodhouse Lane onto University Road.

University of Leeds campus entrance

Parkinson Building now accessible for all

The Parkinson Building, our most iconic building on campus, is now more accessible than ever following the completion of work to upgrade the Parkinson steps and handrails and install a lift at the main entrance of the building. For the first time in its history, the University has made it possible for all visitors, students and staff to enter the Parkinson Building together using the main entrance.

Sabiha Patel, Head of Equality and Inclusion, commented: “I am grateful to the University and delighted with this development to Parkinson Building. Full access to our buildings is an essential first step to inclusion. Everyone should now be able to enter the building easily and take advantage of all the opportunities it affords.”

Steam supply shut off: 18-19 November 2020

Engie, the GSC Refurbishment Contractor, needs to shut the steam supply off to the campus for 4 hours to undertake essential maintenance.

From: Midnight 24:00 – 04:00hrs

Services to be interrupted:

All Campus heating and hot water except The Edge, The Light and Worsley

Effects of this interruption upon building occupants:

We do not expect any other interruptions except the lack of heating and hot water in buildings.

For enquiries please contact: Simon Gough
Contact Telephone No: 0113 343 6988
Mobile: 0791390008
Email: s.j.gough@leeds.ac.uk

If the above member of staff is unavailable, you have any general queries about our services or would like to add or remove a person from this email list, please contact the Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 343 5555 or e-mail: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

Thank you for your patience and apologies for any inconvenience caused.

PC Charlotte Maude stood in front of Parkinson Building

Meet our new Police Higher Education Liaison officer, PC Charlotte Maude

PC Maude started as the new Police Higher Education Liaison Officer in September, taking over from PC Hurrell. Read below to learn a bit more about what attracted her to the role and what she hopes to achieve during her time at the University.

Tell us a bit about your background, how long have you worked for West Yorkshire Police?

I have been a police officer for 7 years, working in west Leeds. I have worked mostly as a patrol officer going to ‘blue light’ jobs, however I have also worked on a neighbourhood policing team. This involved investigating crimes which required a long term problem solving approach.

What was it that attracted you to the role of Police Higher Education Liaison Officer?

The University is a small town, which requires a policing presence. I was attracted to the role due to being able to work as part of a large team full of people with skills from all different walks of life. The student population in Leeds is huge and having the opportunity to be based on campus alongside both students and staff will hopefully give them a safe learning and working environment.

Could you explain a little bit more about your role, and how it helps staff and students at the University?

I am based in the Security Office and work alongside the campus security team. My role involves investigating crimes that have taken place on campus, alongside offering support, advice and guidance to students and staff. I have an open door policy so anyone can drop in when I am at work and I will happily assist where I can. Often people choose to speak to me anonymously for advice so they can make a fully informed decision prior to reporting something to the police.

As I am the liaison officer between the University of Leeds and West Yorkshire Police, I will often take statements and speak with staff and students about matters that have taken place off campus to assist my colleagues.

What are the main things you’re hoping to achieve in your time as Police Higher Education Liaison Officer?

I have come to the University at a very difficult time for everyone because of the covid-19 pandemic. My short term aim is to assist the University in keeping students safe during the pandemic. However, my main focus is to work closely with the security team to both detect and prevent crime to continue to make the University a safe place to both work and study.

What issues or problems would you recommend staff and students coming to talk to you about?

Anything you feel the police would be able to help with. If it turns out to be something that the police would not usually deal with, I will be able to assist you in finding the right department at the University to help you.

What advice would you have for students who have just moved to Leeds?

Leeds is a very big city with a lot to do. Unfortunately options are limited at the moment due to covid-19. However, hopefully, it won’t be forever and soon you’ll be able to take advantage of what Leeds has to offer.

Like other university cities, crimes do take place within student areas. However, there are things you can do to try and prevent yourself from becoming a victim of crime:

  • Lock your doors (even when you are at home)
  • Keep all valuables out of sight
  • Do not walk across dark areas, such as Woodhouse Moor, alone.
How can staff or students get in touch with you?

You can email me C.Maude1@leeds.ac.uk, call me on 07525243483 or come to speak to me at the Security Office:

Security Services
University of Leeds
175 Woodhouse Lane
Leeds
LS2 9JT