Changes to roads near the Esther Simpson Building: 21 June – 31 July

Work taking place adjacent to the Esther Simpson Building.

 

The work will take place from 21 June to the 31 July over two separate places as detailed in the street map below. 

Services to be interrupted:

For Nursery users and other vehicles during both phases this will mean:

  • Nursery parking and access will revert back to the cobbled road on Back-Westbourne Terrace directly outside the FD Building.
  • Cloberry Street will remain partially closed whilst the contractor undertakes highways work.
  • During phase one, the bottom of Cloberry Street will remain open but there will be no through route. Then later in Phase 2 the bottom part of Cloberry Street will be closed making it inaccessible.
  • The main route for vehicles during both phases will be up Back-Westbourne Terrace along Clarendon Place up to Lifton Place.

For pedestrians this will mean:

  • Easier walking routes around the main boundary site of the Esther Simpson Building.
  • Pedestrian access will remain along Cloberry Street during both phases.

Map detailing the areas affected by works taking place on roads near the Esther Simpson Building

For enquiries please contact: Adrian Smith

Contact Telephone No: 0113 343 5555

Email: a.smith1@leeds.ac.uk

If the above member of staff is unavailable, you have any general queries about our services or would like to add or remove a person from this email list, please contact the Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 343 5555 or e-mail: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

Thank you for your patience and apologies for any inconvenience caused.

Thousands of trees planted at Leeds Brownlee Triathlon Centre

5,000 trees planted at the Brownlee Triathlon Centre

University of Leeds and the Environment Agency plant 5000 trees at the Brownlee Triathlon Centre as part of natural measures to reduce flood risk.

The University of Leeds in partnership with the Environment Agency have planted more than 5000 trees at the University’s Brownlee Triathlon Centre to reduce flood risk to the Leeds area downstream.

Tree planting at Bodington Playing Fields, where the Brownlee Triathlon Centre is located, took place between February and March, and is part of a wider programme of natural flood management techniques being introduced into the Leeds catchment as part of the Leeds Flood Alleviation Scheme’s flagship Natural Flood Management Project. The project is a great example of the University’s partnership approach to addressing the climate crisis through collaborative research and innovation.

The Brownlee Triathlon Centre and surrounding area was earmarked as the first urban pilot site last year as part of the Leeds Flood Alleviation Scheme’s Natural Flood Management Project – looking at alternative and sustainable ways to manage flood risk and increase resilience to climate change. This will work alongside, and complement, traditional engineering being implemented through the Leeds Flood Alleviation Scheme, whilst also creating habitat for wildlife and helping regenerate rural and urban areas through tourism.

Thousands of trees planted at Leeds Brownlee Triathlon Centre

The scheme is also part of the University of Leeds Living Lab programme, with the site to be used for live research projects to test sustainable solutions; be an integral part of University teaching, and be a location for local schools and communities to visit.

Five sites have been set up to implement natural flood risk management techniques throughout the river catchment from the source of the River Aire, at Malham, through to Leeds City Centre, and are using natural measures such as tree planting and woodland creation, wetland scrapes and leaky barriers to reduce flood risk and benefit the environment.

James Wright, Head of Grounds and Gardens at the University of Leeds, said:

“We are delighted to have been a key partner in this scheme and assisted in the planting of 5000 trees as part of the Leeds Flood Alleviation Scheme Natural Flood Management Project. This work has involved exceptional collaboration between academic and operational colleagues at the University of Leeds and the Environment Agency.

The site will provide significant research opportunities for University of Leeds students and academics for many years undertaking research in a range of specialisms. The site provides a great engagement opportunity for the local community to fully understand the range of NFM solutions installed in the Aire Valley catchment and research undertaken at the University.”

Fiona Sugden, The Environment Agency’s Leeds NFM Project Manager, said:

“It’s fantastic news that 5000 trees have now been planted at this site. The creation of a woodland area will have multiple benefits for people and wildlife – not just reducing flood risk downstream, but will benefit the environment by creating new woodland habitat, boosting biodiversity, help mitigate climate change, whilst also providing valuable opportunities for people to understand how well natural flood techniques perform.

The Triathlon Centre is a real asset for students and the local community, and we hope that visitors will also be able to learn about how effective natural flood management can be.”

Natural flood management is an important part of the Environment Agency’s strategy in protecting communities from flood risk and they work with natural processes and use natural flood management measures where they are technically feasible and provide good value.

It can be a cost-effective and sustainable way to manage flood risk alongside, and supporting, traditional engineering, while creating habitat for wildlife and helping regenerate rural and urban areas through tourism.

For more information about the University’s response to the climate crisis.

For out more about the University of Leeds Living Lab.

Bains wing and The great Wall

Local and Community History Month 2021

May is Local and Community History Month. To celebrate, we’ve collated a collection of old photographs of campus to help increase awareness of local history.

The Bains Wing/Great Hall

  • Construction started on The Great Hall in 1884 and took 10 years to complete.
  • Along with Clothworkers Buildings and Baines Wing, the building was designed by Alfred Waterhouse (famous for his work on the Natural History Museum in London).
  • The red brick style waterhouse used for the buildings helped coin the term ‘red brick university’.

An old photo of The Great Hall

Leeds University Business School (LUBS)

  • The Leeds University Business School (LUBS) acquired the 19th century Maurice Keyworth, previously owned by Leeds Grammar School
  • LUBS have since constructed further modern buildings around the Maurice Keyworth, such as the Clarendon Building and Charles Thackrah Building.

An old photo of the LUBS building which used to be a Grammar school

The Brotherton Library

  • Before the Brotherton Library was built, the undercroft of The Great Hall housed all of the University’s library collections
  • In 1927, Edward Brotherton donated £100,000 to the University to fund its first purpose-built library
  • Today, the Beaux-Arts building is Grade ll listed.

An old photo of the Brotherton Library

Find out more about the history of the University of Leeds.

Sir William Henry Bragg Building project

Summer opening for Sir William Henry Bragg Building

There are just a few months to go now before doors open into the Sir William Henry Building.

Construction on the new development completed in April and fit out work is now underway. This is a major stage of the building and involves significant amounts of research equipment, existing and new, being installed, as well as Av set up across all research and teaching spaces.

David Oldroyd, Senior Estates Project Manager commented:

“We are only a few months away from full completion of the building and I know colleagues and students are looking forward to being in this new facility. The building has been designed in a manner to present numerous opportunities for collaborative research and teaching to take place – all of which will contribute to the University’s ambition be highly impact focused and make a positive difference in the world.

Over the next few months, our focus remains on the fit-out and liaising closely with the schools moving into the building to ensure the transition is as speedy and smooth as possible.”

The latest stage of fit-out can be seen in the video below:

For more detailed information about the fit-out stage visit our FAQ’s section.

 

Workspace at FBS

Facility boost for Biological Sciences

The Faculty of Biological Sciences teaching and research facilities have been boosted at Leeds following the completion of the refurbishment of the Garstang building, levels 4 and 9. Once the finishing touches have been completed, the floor will be open for business!

Investment and improvements in the Faculty of Biological Sciences have created a new flexible model for open laboratory and office environments, facilitating joint work, all of which will enhance research capacity, research experience and associated research outputs and income.

The improvement works have also reduced the University’s energy consumption and carbon footprint, through upgrades such as window replacement and improved energy efficiencies through heating, cooling and ventilation.

Commenting on the project, Sarah Bacsich, Estates Project Manager said:

“We hope the Faculty and staff enjoy and benefit from working in these new areas and must thank everyone who has been part of this project, the Faculty, estates colleagues, consultant and contractor teams who have all worked together and remained focused on the end result, despite the challenges the project met along the way.

“Looking ahead, the improvements and new facilities on Level 4 and 9 now provide an exciting new environment for the Faculty of Biological Sciences research staff and students – this new home will encourage new ways of working to champion groundbreaking research.”

Karen Birch, Executive Dean of the Faculty of Biological Sciences commented:

“We are all delighted that this phase of the development of the Faculty is complete. Seeing the finished design is really exciting and stimulates the imagination for pushing the boundaries of biomedical research. I am particularly thrilled that our excellent scientists, from postgraduates to Faculty academics will experience working in such a high quality, modern, airy and stimulating space. This new environment will enable enhanced collaborative research to underpin our vision of exploring biological challenges to accelerate real world impact and translation. What a great environment in which to work and develop the science leaders of the future!”

Refurbishment of Level 4 and Level 9 – Virtual tour video

You can get a feel for the new facilities through our virtual tour video:

 

Our external-facing article is also now live on the FBS website.

Find out more about the refurbishment of the Garstang Building.

The Garstang building, levels 4 and 9

new Esther Simpson building artwork

New artwork announced for the Esther Simpson Building

A new artwork sculpture titled “To leaf is to learn” has been commissioned and will be placed on the Esther Simpson Building in the coming months.

‘To leaf is to learn.’

These are the somewhat cryptic words emblazoned across an exciting new artwork poised to take centre stage in an equally impressive new gateway to campus when the Esther Simpson Building completes this summer.

Cryptic, that is, until an explanation from none other than the Poet Laureate himself shines light on their meaning.

It turns out our very own Professor of Poetry, Simon Armitage, is the creative mind behind the profound prose that will adorn the stunning sculpture.

Professor Armitage drew inspiration from the concept that the artwork represents notebook sheets – a common element in a student’s life.

He explained: “The words came in direct response to the artwork itself.

“The empty ‘pages’ seemed to invite text, and I tried to use the opportunity to encourage the act of reading and writing – both as an education and a pleasure – in terms of the excitement that comes from leafing through books and from making our marks on surfaces.

I think there’s also a message about growing up, the human mind ‘coming into leaf’, especially during those university years. And a subconscious message, too, about the environment – how our own growth and understanding is linked to the processes and systems of the natural world.”

International Collaboration

Fashioned out of giant metal sheets by world-renowned Spanish sculptor, Juanjo Novella, the artwork is both pensive and poetic.

Novella, known for his imposing public works of art in major cities dotted across the globe, was commissioned to create what will become a striking addition to an impressive new entrance on the western campus.

And the commission started an exciting international collaboration between Novella and Professor Armitage – one that will come to form a fascinating addition to our public art trail, while at the same time serving to inspire staff and students in their academic and professional pursuits.

Novella praised Professor Armitage for the way in which he approached the task with such creative vision.

He said: “It was just wonderful. Simon showed great generosity, which is what adorns great men, since he adapted to my needs. I’m very happy because Simon’s collaboration works on many levels. It was a real pleasure – one I wouldn’t mind repeating in the future.”

Installation of the artwork will take place this summer, with the process being supervised by Novella himself, who’s excited to visit Leeds and see his creation become a part of campus life.

He added: “I want this sculpture to be a living element that adds a sense of identity to the place. It is a silent and active sculpture at the same time. I have to say that this work made me incredibly excited because it is a sculpture that will be displayed in the UK – a country that I admire a lot. I’ve been greatly inspired by [British] sculptors like Anthony Caro, Antony Gormley, Richard Long, Tony Cragg, Anish Kapoor and others.”

Innovative teaching centre

The sculpture will be located on the new Esther Simpson Building in Cloberry Street, which is due to open this autumn as part of the transformation programme for Leeds University Business School (LUBS) and the School of Law. Named after a former Leeds graduate, whose life-long vocation saw her help resettle scholars fleeing from totalitarian regimes across the world, the innovative teaching centre will provide world-class facilities that support participative learning and create an inspirational setting for staff and students – a fitting tribute to someone whose “tireless work reflects the values of the University”.

Professor Julia Bennell, Executive Dean of LUBS, said:

“This ambitious new building on the western campus will enhance our student experience; providing modern facilities and flexible teaching space. It’s important that we create an inspiring environment for staff, students and industry partners, and the artwork will be key to that experience.

On visiting the building, we hope the artwork speaks for the ambition and harmony the Business School aspires to with its surroundings, community and wider partnerships. We hope it will be a timeless inspiration for our students and staff, and will help welcome visitors to our innovative and inclusive space for education, research and collaboration.”

Another important aspect of the sculpture is the involvement of landscape architects and a lighting engineer to help create a true landmark – a physical link between the western campus and the central areas of the University.

It will become an extension of the Esther Simpson Building, visible from the building’s ground floor café and the teaching spaces above.

Professor Alastair Mullis, Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences, said: “The School of Law is incredibly excited about the opening of the Esther Simpson building, which will provide a transformative teaching space close to our Liberty Building home on western campus and allow us to further develop our student experience.

We aim to create a campus environment that is truly inspirational and that meets the standards that we set as one of the top ranked law schools in the UK. In the years ahead, this artwork project will help welcome generations of students and academics to the school.”

Raising the curtain

Following a competitive selection process, Novella was chosen to design the sculpture because of his unique approach to engaging with urban landscapes.

It will certainly stand out – at 20 metres long and three metres high, the artwork will certainly impose itself on its surroundings.

And the sculpture will also serve another important purpose, minimising the aesthetic impact of a nearby electrical substation – acting as a ‘curtain’ to hide this ‘industrial’ feature.

Novella said: “It is a curtain – a wall created with leaves of paper torn from a notebook. Its sinuous shape creates curves that modulate light and stimulate the urban landscape. I like to imagine people around my sculptures – touching them, leaning on them, children playing. I want this work to be a living element that adds a sense of identity to the place where it’s located.”

Public art trail Novella’s sculpture is another important addition to our impressive range of public artwork, which is celebrated with a public art trail that guides visitors, staff and students around the collection. It will join other sculptures on campus, including Liliane Lijn’s Converse Column, Hubert Dalwood’s relief, Simon Fujiwara’s A Spire and Dual Form by British sculptor Barbara Hepworth. The latter of these is on loan from Leeds Art Gallery, together with Henry Moore’s Three Piece Reclining Figure No.2: Bridge Prop, which is currently housed outside the Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery in the Parkinson Building.

Storm Jameson Exterior

Hail the women in research and education

This year we celebrated the women our buildings are named after.  

To mark the celebrations for this year’s International Women’s Day, here are some of the iconic pioneering women in scientific research and education that our campus buildings have been named after. We look forward to doing more of the same in future.

Marjorie Ziff

Marjorie Ziff MBE is an English philanthropist known for her assistance to the Leeds Jewish community. She is now a patron of the Leeds Jewish Welfare Board.

Ziff is an honorary graduate and a long-standing friend of the University of Leeds. 

As a result of her help within the community of Leeds, Ziff received an MBE in the 2011 New Year Honours.

Marjorie and Arnold Ziff Building Exterior

Marjorie and Arnold Ziff Building

Esther Simpson

University of Leeds graduate Esther Simpson was a dedicated, honourable lobbyist and organiser for the Academic Assistance Council. She helped to restructure the cultural and intellectual landscape of the Western World. 

Esther helped hundreds of refugees during World War II, placing them in different work positions all over the world. She received an OBE in 1956 as a result of her efforts.

Esther Simpson CGI

Artist’s impression of the Esther Simpson building

Irene Manton

Irene Manton was a British botanist and Professor of Botany at the University of Leeds, well-known for her study of ferns and algae. 

She was made the first female President of the Linnean Society of London. 

Manton established the biological use of electron microscopy. 

Irene Manton Exterior

Irene Manton building

Storm Jameson 

Margaret Ethel Storm Jameson was an English journalist and author, recognised for her novels and reviews. 

Jameson was President of the British International PEN Association , and actively helped refugee writers. 

She joined the National Union of Women Suffrage Societies, and in 1913, participated in the Women’s Pilgrimage to show the House of Commons how many women wanted the vote. 

Storm Jameson Exterior

Storm Jameson Court

Esther Simpson Exterior

Summer completion for Esther Simpson

The Esther Simpson Building is still on course to be completed this summer and the first phase of the landscaping and highways work associated with the project begins in April. The work will initially focus on a wheelchair friendly route from the rear of Leeds University Union up to Cromer Terrace. 

Work on site is progressing well with the contractor BAM. The building is now watertight and the electrical and mechanical services have completed their ‘first ‘fix’. 

Landscape works have also commenced around the south elevation and next to the FD building, and will progress around the east side of the building.  

Read more about the project, view photos and this months’ time lapse of the construction

Esther Simpson Lecture Theatre

A lecture theatre in the Esther Simpson building

Exterior of Sir William Henry Bragg Building

A facility to Bragg about!

Earlier this month we were delighted to receive handover of the Sir William Henry Bragg building from the contractors ‘BAM’.  

When the building fit out completes this summer, this new facility will enable research to be conducted on national and international platforms to solve the challenges the world faces right now. It will also inspire current and future generations of students to innovate and drive change for a better future.  

The next steps in the coming months are to migrate research equipment (new and existing) into the building and recalibrate, also with service connections, as necessary. Full furniture fit out will also take place along with IT / AV installations ready for teaching this autumn. 

Read more about the project, view photos, and a time lapse of the construction

The Sir William Henry Bragg Building

Public realm improvements: 23 March – 12 May

Improvements being made to specific campus public realm areas between 22 March – 12 May 2021

The work will be focused in three areas:

Area 1: Paths to the top of University Road

Area 2: Front and rear of 10 Cromer Terrace

Area 3: Car park area and path between Storm Jameson and Lyddon Hall

map of public realm improvements on campus

Services to be interrupted:

Footpaths will be affected in these areas

Effects of this interruption:

There will be some disruption during the course of the works. The work will take place between 8am and 4pm. Noisy works will be minimised and restricted to 9:30am to 4pm.

For enquiries please contact: Adrian Smith

Contact Telephone No: 0113 343 5555

Email: a.smith1@leeds.ac.uk

If the above member of staff is unavailable, you have any general queries about our services or would like to add or remove a person from this email list, please contact the Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 343 5555 or e-mail: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

Thank you for your patience and apologies for any inconvenience caused.