Closure of Vernon Road, Cavendish Road and Lodge Street

Due to essential highway reconstruction, on 6 January – 19 January 2023, Vernon Road will be closed to traffic and traffic management will be in place on Cavendish Road to facilitate resurfacing.  Lodge Street will be closed for the period of work with no parking prior to it being resurfaced.

Effects of this interruption

6 January 2023: Lodge Street closed for delivery of site welfare, deliveries and set up of site compound – Lodge Street

9 – 13 January 2023: Vernon Road closed for deep excavation to rebuild the surface

17 – 18 January 2023: Vernon Road and Cavendish Road closed for surfacing and traffic management.

19 January 2023: Lodge Street closed for surfacing

Services to be interrupted

Vernon Road closed, no access for vehicles greater than 7.5T to the south of campus.  A diversion in place for vehicles under 7.5T via Willow Terrace Road.

Effects of this interruption upon building occupants

Restricted vehicle access and traffic management in place.

 

Alternative access routes are highlighted on the map below.

Closure of Vernon Road, Cavendish Road and Lodge Street Closure of Vernon Road, Cavendish Road and Lodge Street

 

For enquiries please contact: James Wright, Senior Maintenance Manager

Contact Telephone No: 0113 343 5981 Mobile: 07534 982249

Email: j.r.wright@leeds.ac.uk

If the above member of staff is unavailable, you have any general queries about our services or would like to add or remove a person from this email list, please contact the Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 343 5555 or e-mail: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

Thank you for your patience and apologies for any inconvenience caused.

Cleaning services training development day

Cleaning team focus on collaboration

Team leaders from Cleaning Services took part in a development day on Tuesday, working with colleagues across the University.

The theme for the day was working together as one team and how collaboration brings positive impact for all involved.

Jill Roberts, Head of Cleaning Services said: 

“It’s so important to invest in personal and professional development, and while it is always difficult to find the time, it was obvious how much everyone got from the day.”

“Collaboration is a University Value and reflects the direction of the Facilities Directorate as a whole, which we are proud to be a part of.”

“Thank you to colleagues from the Staff Counselling Service, Health & Wellbeing, Security and OD&PL who joined us.”

The Cleaning team are integral to the running of the University and Jill has recently received a large number of appreciative emails from across campus. These included:

“I just had to write this morning to let you know how blown away we are with the cleaners here in Maths, who always go above and beyond what is expected. They are extremely friendly and continuously do an amazing job!”

And from Psychology:

“They were professional, cheerful and did a fantastic job! We are really grateful to them all and they definitely made a difference.”

LITAC new meeting room

New space for the Leeds Institute of Textiles & Colour

A new base has been completed for the Leeds Institute of Textiles & Colour (LITAC) in the Clothworkers Central Building, with the management team due to move in this week.

The interior design team, part of the Estates team in the University’s Facilities Directorate, worked with Associated Architects to create the bright and airy space which comprises a large meeting room, offices, and a reception area with kitchen.

In consultation with LITAC, the design compliments the brand identity of the Institute, using the colours of its logo (black, cream, white and gold) in the style and finishes, while also being sympathetic to the Clothworkers’ Tower building in which the office is situated.

David Oldroyd, Interim Director of Development, Estates & Facilities said:

“The area was previously used by Chemistry and there was a lot of work to do before the build started, including dismantling fume cupboards and opening up the space. Lodestone were employed to do the build and have done a great job.”

“It was a pleasure for the Estates team to work with LITAC, who have excellence in design at the heart of their work. The result is a high spec, highly functional and inviting space.”

It has been designed not only with functionality and comfort for the team at its core, but also to provide a collaborative place for hosting the Institute’s research partners across different industries in a professional and creative environment.

About LITAC

LITAC is a collaborative University of Leeds research Institute that was founded in 2021. The Institute sits within the School of Design but works across campus coordinating expertise and resources to address global research challenges related to textiles, colour and fashion.

Its roots date back almost 150 years in textile and colour research. Building on the generous support of the Clothworkers’ Company in 1874, the legacy continues as LITAC will be based within the historical Clothworkers’ Buildings at the University of Leeds.

Professor Steve Russell, Director of LITAC said:

“The space has been transformed and provides colleagues with a superb facility for collaborative discussions, right next to the Institute’s extensive research labs and equipment.”

“With a dedicated entrance off Clothworkers’ Court, we look forward to welcoming all visitors to the Institute.”

Photos by John Tees photography

Drone shot of Bodington Football Hub

New community football facility for Leeds

Grassroots sport in Leeds received a huge boost in October with the unveiling of the Bodington Football Hub, a new facility for the community of Leeds.

Located at Sports Park Bodington – part of the University of Leeds – the new Hub is built in partnership with the Football Foundation and includes three full-size, artificial 3G floodlit football pitches, car parking and a pavilion with changing facilities and a café.

It has been made possible thanks to a £4.3m grant from the Football Foundation which is a charity supported by the Premier League, the Football Association and the Government.

The result of partnership working between the University, the Football Foundation, West Riding County FA, and Leeds City Council, the Hub progresses the development of four sites in Leeds that together will provide 13 new full-size pitches, responding to the need for sporting facilities in and around the city.

David Oldroyd, Interim Deputy Director of Development said:

“This was a major project for the Estates team working with partners across the university and elsewhere. The Hub is a key facility for the community, and the design of the pavilion – which includes communal seating and inspiring artwork –  reflects that.”

The University already partners extensively with community clubs and schools through its volunteering programme, which sees students coaching and officiating locally.

Ella Williams, Activities & Opportunities Officer, Leeds University Union (LUU) said:

“LUU is here to help students love their time at Leeds, and for me that includes being part of a wider community in the city and the region.”

“While the Hub will host many community clubs, I know that our own footballers are excited about having access to this state-of-the-art facility and about the University and the Football Foundation contributing to local sport in this way.”

Robert Sullivan, Chief Executive of the Football Foundation, added:

“This is a brilliant example of how investment from our partners, the Premier League, The FA, Government and Sport England improves grassroots facilities across the country.”

People planting the trees at Gair Wood woodland

A new woodland for Leeds

A young oak was planted today to mark a new initiative to develop woodland on land owned by the University of Leeds.

Situated next to Golden Acre Park at Bramhope, the 37-hectare site – the size of 37 rugby pitches – will eventually be home to 66,000 new trees, a mixture of broadleaf species including oak, elder, hornbeam, wild cherry and silver birch.

Gair Wood has been developed as the result of a partnership between the Estates Team, Sustainability Service, United Bank of Carbon and the White Rose Forest and is named for Roger Gair who was University Secretary for more than 20 years and retired in 2021 and who put the first tree into the ground in a ceremony today (Friday 2 December.)

James Wright, Senior Maintenance Manager in the Facilities Directorate said:

“Mass planting of the woodland begins in the New Year with a team of professional landscapers and an opportunity for the public and volunteers from the University to get involved too.

“Gair Wood  contributes to the target set by the White Rose Forest, the community forest for West and North Yorkshire by 2025, for 7 million more trees by 2025. It’s fantastic that the university is a part of this.”

Until the young trees have become well established, public access will be restricted, with increasing levels of access over the next five years as the saplings develop. The woodland will be connected by paths to the Leeds Country Way.

University’s Climate Plan

Developing Gair Wood is also part of the University’s Climate Plan through which the University is committed to net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

Dr Cat Scott, University Academic Fellow based in the School of Earth and Environment at Leeds and academic lead for Gair Wood, said:

 “Creating this woodland will allow us to explore the impacts, in real-time, of tree planting as a nature-based solution to climate change. Researchers with a wide range of expertise are coming together to assess changes to diverse aspects of the site like the composition of the soil, the species of wildlife present, and local air quality as this new woodland evolves.”

The woodland will also connect existing habitats that have become fragmented, allowing wildlife to move to find food, mates and new locations to live. Students have already conducted baseline measurement of plants, insects, birds and mammals and these will be tracked to monitor how these change over the coming years.

The project is funded by the White Rose Forest through Defra’s Nature for Climate Fund with support from the Leeds City Council and the Forestry Commission.

Find out more about the University’s Sustainability Services.

Restricted Access to Electronic and Electrical Engineering Building

External landscaping works will be undertaken around the Helium Recovery Suite site area which may be disruptive in nature. The works include breaking out of the existing tarmac covering including sections of concrete plinths prior to making good. The works will run from 28 November till 16 December.

Services to be interrupted

Restricted/managed pedestrian and vehicular access will be enforced within the area including to the Bragg goods inwards loading bay. Access will remain into the rear basement area of Electronic and Electrical Engineering for the duration of the works however may be managed during specific activities.

Effects of this interruption upon building occupants

Restricted access to the perimeter of the construction site in addition to the presence of contractors and short periods of noise disruption.

 

For enquiries please contact: Adam Ives

Mobile: 07864802762
Email:
 a.ives@leeds.ac.uk

If the above member of staff is unavailable, you have any general queries about our services or would like to add or remove a person from this email list, please contact the Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 3435555 or e-mail: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

 

Thank you for your patience and apologies for any inconvenience caused.

Clarendon Way closed

On 30 September, Clarendon way will be closed from 8:00am till 5:00pm. Equans, the contractor refurbishing the Generating Station Complex (GSC) will close Clarendon Way to vehicle and foot traffic for a crane lift.

Services to be interrupted

Clarendon way will be closed to vehicle and foot traffic.

Effects of this interruption upon building occupants

We do not expect any other interruptions.

 

For enquiries please contact: Simon Gough

Mobile: 07913 900088
Email: s.j.gough@leeds.ac.uk

If the above member of staff is unavailable, you have any general queries about our services or would like to add or remove a person from this email list, please contact the Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 343 5555 or e-mail: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

Thank you for your patience and apologies for any inconvenience caused.

 

Flower meadow

Gold for University in Yorkshire in Bloom Awards

 The University of Leeds has been awarded Gold status and is a category winner in the annual Yorkshire in Bloom Awards.  

Judges from the regional body representing the Britain in Bloom campaign gave special mention to the University’s partnership working, particularly with students and staff. This includes work by the student biodiversity ambassadors, who map and create plans surrounding biodiversity on campus and within residences, and projects such as the North Hill Well Wood project, which was completed this year. 

The accessibility of our gardens and the signs within them, our mature trees and the encouragement of biodiversity around campus, particularly at Roger Stevens Pond, were also singled out.  

James Wright, Senior Maintenance Manager said: 

“Our campus – at the heart of the city – is a haven for wildlife and contains plenty of spaces for staff, students and visitors to relax in.  

“Our planting is carefully considered, and we are very pleased to achieve this recognition.” 

 

Mike Leonard, Residential Property Manager, University of Leeds said: 

We are very grateful to Yorkshire in Bloom for this recognition of our work to create a welcoming and well-maintained campus.  

“Collaboration is key to our success, working with teams in Estates, Residential and Sustainability Services, alongside students and external organisations such as Buglife; Yorkshire Wildlife Trust; Hedgehog-Friendly Campus and Groundwork Yorkshire, so we can make spaces that have a positive impact on wellbeing as well as the environment “

 This is not the first time that the University of Leeds has received great results for Yorkshire in Bloom, winning gold awards in both 2017 and 2019 

Judges said: 

“The most surprising element of visiting Leeds University campus is the ability to forget that you are in the centre of a major city whilst being surrounded by greenery and tranquillity.”

Find out more about our Grounds and Gardens Team

Sustainable garden team

Accessible makeover for the Sustainable Garden

Ayesha Fitzwilliam Hall, an apprentice in the Grounds and Gardens team, spotted an opportunity to develop her skills by redesigning and refreshing the Sustainable Garden, a much loved area of campus which had become overgrown following COVID-19 lockdowns.

She has worked with her colleagues and the Sustainability service to redesign the space to improve accessibility and usability. This includes the introduction of raised planting areas, new furniture to support workshops and learning, and establishing new edible planting to ensure that the space is ready to welcome students and staff back to campus in 2022.

Ayesha said:

“The Sustainable Garden is a wonderful area but lockdowns and fewer people on campus had an impact on its usability. I enjoyed leading a team of colleagues on the redesign work to make sure that the space was once again a great place for everyone on campus. The bigger task though, has been restoring the garden in line with the University’s sustainability principles. It’s hard work but I’m proud of what I’ve achieved. I hope to welcome lots of people to enjoy and volunteer in the space over the next year.”

More improvements will be added over the coming weeks and months, including a wellbeing area, with a view to bringing back regular volunteer gardening sessions for staff and students through this term and beyond.

Find out more about the Sustainability service at the University of Leeds.

Robert Bradley and Weetwood floodlight

New low carbon floodlights latest step to Net Zero by 2030

Low energy LED floodlights recently installed at Sports Park Weetwood – part of the University of Leeds – are set to reduce carbon emissions by 6.7 tonnes a year.

Their installation is among the latest activity in the work by Estates and Facilities to move the campus towards delivering net zero emissions by 2030, a key commitment of the University Climate Plan. 

The LED floodlights use less electricity than previous equipment and have greater light output, which means fewer fittings need to be installed. They also have a longer life span.

It is estimated the new lights will save 29,879 kWh of energy per year, which equates to a reduction of 6.7 tonnes of CO2 equivalent emissions.

Ann Allen, Director of Campus Innovation and Development said:

“All the work that we do makes a difference to students and staff however our work to move the campus towards delivering net zero by 2030 is the biggest single project by the Estates and Facilities team to make a difference to our planet and is at the core of the University’s Climate Plan.”

“It includes the targeted refurbishment of buildings, the installation of low carbon technologies and solar panels across the estate – including sports facilities like those at Weetwood – and the electrification of our vehicle fleet.”

“This work builds on activity over many years to save electricity across the breadth of the Leeds campus including installation of LED lighting and working with Faculties to use out campus more effectively.”

Reducing carbon emissions across the University

Other activity to reduce emissions – outlined in the recent Climate Plan quarterly report – includes work to develop a new heating, cooling and ventilation policy to reduce energy use. A shutdown of the steam network over the summer months contributed towards a 15% reduction in emissions between June and August 2022.

University Residences have begun a programme of low energy lighting upgrades, starting at Lupton.

A major project is currently underway to assess the opportunities for building retrofit and heat pump installation across campus to reduce energy demand, alongside identification of opportunities to install further solar panels on University buildings.

Further work has been commissioned including a report into climate resilience on campus, and an analysis of electrical requirements over the next 25 years.