Sir William Henry Bragg Building

Major milestones in sight for 2021

Here at Campus Developments, the team are beginning to gear up for Spring 2021 celebrations that will take place to mark major capital development milestones at the Faculty of Biological Sciences and the Sir William Henry Bragg Building.

Over the last few months, and despite the difficulties that have arisen from the pandemic, we have worked hard with our construction partners to keep our key capital development projects moving. The finishing line for the FBS Refurbishment project is starting to come into sight with work by the Contractor Overbury due to finish at the end of February 2021. The investment and improvements will continue driving forward the growth of research income and create a new flexible model for open laboratory and office environments, facilitating collaborative working. Find out more about the latest progress that has been taking place.

Meanwhile, over at the Sir William Henry Bragg Building the BAM contractor team are looking ahead to completing full construction works in February next year. They are currently concluding all the majority of physical works, finalising external landscaping work and completing commissioning activities. The new 15,700m2 building will enable the integration of the University disciplines of Engineering, Physics and Astronomy, and Computing along with the provision of critical central teaching and social interaction spaces.

Online tours of both projects will be showcased in the Spring and we hope these will be followed by in-person building tours for large numbers of staff once it is safe to do so.

There’s only one-way

Lifton Place and Cromer Terrace will soon be heading in a new direction once work begins on a new scheme to create a one-way contra flow system in that area.

Currently in the vicinity of Lifton Place and Cromer Terrace the Esther Simpson building is being constructed and when complete it will naturally attract large numbers of students and staff to this area of campus. To ensure the area remains as safe as possible for all pedestrians and cyclists and to reduce traffic congestion, plans are in place to reconfigure the road layout.

The three-phased scheme will commence in Spring 2021 and complete in Autumn 2021.

Phase 1: Spring 2021

The first phase of works will encompass the creation of a much-improved accessible route from the rear of LUU to Cromer Terrace. This will improve access to the western side of campus and the Esther Simpson Building whilst also contributing to the University’s wider strategy to make campus more accessible and wheelchair friendly.

Phase 2: Easter – Summer 2021

Significant work will take place along Cromer Road to create a service yard for University Catering service vehicles only. This area has traditionally been a bottleneck and the new measures will create a more effective access route for delivery vehicles and make the area safer for nearby passing pedestrians and drivers. There will no longer be pedestrian access in this specific area. The new layout will allow vehicles a dedicated space for parking and will eliminate the current congestion issues caused by parked vehicles on the corner of Cromer Terrace.

Phase 3: Summer 2021 – Autumn 2021

The final phase of works in the scheme will see Lifton Place and Cromer Terrace becoming one-way single flow for vehicles. A contra flow will also be created along these roads to ensure safety for cyclists. The footpath along Lifton Place will also be widened. This will help to reduce the congestion that often occurs during class change over in term time. The safety of our staff and students is a priority and a raised platform area will additionally be created to slow traffic down along Lifton Place and Cromer Terrace. Soft landscaping along the terraces on LIfton Place will complete the scheme.

Parkinson Building lights switching off

Christmas shutdown advice

We are committed to lowering our carbon emissions and this year’s extended Christmas shutdown period gives us an opportunity to cut energy waste.

We know that working patterns at the University have changed with many of us working from home for significant proportions of the time. Those of us that are visiting campus for essential reasons may be on site infrequently or less regularly than before. It is important that any equipment that is used is switched off (where possible) between campus visits, and particularly as we approach the Christmas break.

Despite the majority of the University estate being unused over the Christmas period, on average each year we still consume a total of 155,000 kWh of electricity and 143,000 kWh of heat on Christmas Day.

This is as much electricity as 40 average UK homes use in a full year!

This Christmas the shutdown period runs from Monday 21 December to Monday 4 January – with fewer staff on Campus, those of us that are present can have a real impact by:

  • switching off lights and closing windows
  • ensuring as much lab equipment as possible is turned off before you leave – drying cabinets and incubators etc.; and
  • checking IT equipment, including screens and projectors are turned off.
  • don’t forget less obvious energy wasters, too. Printers, hot water boilers and microwaves can all be unplugged during the Christmas break.

We understand some equipment is required to maintain safety or is being used for research purposes and therefore needs to remain on. However, switching off any equipment which can be turned off will help to reduce carbon emissions.

Thank you for your continued support, and we hope you have a great Christmas!

Parkinson Building

Creating a campus for everyone

A key aim for the University is to have a campus that is accessible for everyone.

The Facilities Directorate has been working hard to improve the accessibility of existing areas of campus, as well as to make equality of access a top consideration in the planning of new buildings.

In light of #DisabilityHistoryMonth we thought that this would be a great opportunity to showcase the accessibility works that have taken place across campus over the past years.

Discovery Way opens up campus

The completion of Nexus on the eastern edge of the University has opened up a new accessible route onto campus. The Discovery Way entrance is located on Woodhouse Lane, and provides a step-free route to the Orange Zone car park and E C Stoner Building, and from there to The Edge, Roger Stevens, Chancellor’s Court and beyond.

Nexus Discovery Way

Chemistry lift completed

The new lift in the School of Chemistry has now been completed, providing an accessible route to lecture theatres A and B.

Accessible water fountain fitted

A bespoke-designed water fountain has been installed on the Precinct. The fountain has two water spouts, one of which is positioned so that it is easily accessible for wheelchair users. Fill up your water bottle there and help with the University’s #2023PlasticFree Pledge!

Campus map updated with new defibrillators

The interactive campus map has been updated to show the locations of new defibrillators which have been fitted at Henry Price, Nexus and in Clothworker’s Court.

Further improvements to external steps on campus

There have been further improvements made to external steps across campus. Handrails have been fitted on the steps under the Roger Stevens Building leading to the Astbury Centre and on the steps leading down to the Edward Boyle Library from the Social Sciences Building. The steps have been lined with yellow paint to further improve campus accessibility.

Edward Boyle Steps

Ensuring digital accessibility for all

In response to new legislation setting a higher expectation for digital accessibility, the University has been taking steps to recognise where accessibility can be improved across our digital estate. An accessibility statement has been published on the University’s corporate website explaining which areas of the estate are not yet fully accessible, and how we plan to improve their accessibility.
The University has also engaged a third-party auditor to test our websites’ compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. Following on from this the University Communications team is running awareness sessions for relevant staff across the University to explain what is needed to improve our accessibility further.

Makeover for University’s main entrance

A large project to improve the look and general accessibility around the main entrance to the University has now been completed. Previously the area where the Michael Sadler Building meets the side of the Parkinson Building had sloping feathered steps on one side, and uneven ground without a clear pathway on the other. These feathered steps have been removed and replaced with a green area featuring a newly planted semi-mature tree. On the other side, the seating area has been redone with more attractive furniture, improved landscaping and clear accessible routes to allow easy access from Woodhouse Lane onto University Road.

University of Leeds campus entrance

Parkinson Building now accessible for all

The Parkinson Building, our most iconic building on campus, is now more accessible than ever following the completion of work to upgrade the Parkinson steps and handrails and install a lift at the main entrance of the building. For the first time in its history, the University has made it possible for all visitors, students and staff to enter the Parkinson Building together using the main entrance.

Sabiha Patel, Head of Equality and Inclusion, commented: “I am grateful to the University and delighted with this development to Parkinson Building. Full access to our buildings is an essential first step to inclusion. Everyone should now be able to enter the building easily and take advantage of all the opportunities it affords.”

Steam supply shut off: 18-19 November 2020

Engie, the GSC Refurbishment Contractor, needs to shut the steam supply off to the campus for 4 hours to undertake essential maintenance.

From: Midnight 24:00 – 04:00hrs

Services to be interrupted:

All Campus heating and hot water except The Edge, The Light and Worsley

Effects of this interruption upon building occupants:

We do not expect any other interruptions except the lack of heating and hot water in buildings.

For enquiries please contact: Simon Gough
Contact Telephone No: 0113 343 6988
Mobile: 0791390008
Email: s.j.gough@leeds.ac.uk

If the above member of staff is unavailable, you have any general queries about our services or would like to add or remove a person from this email list, please contact the Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 343 5555 or e-mail: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

Thank you for your patience and apologies for any inconvenience caused.

PC Charlotte Maude stood in front of Parkinson Building

Meet our new Police Higher Education Liaison officer, PC Charlotte Maude

PC Maude started as the new Police Higher Education Liaison Officer in September, taking over from PC Hurrell. Read below to learn a bit more about what attracted her to the role and what she hopes to achieve during her time at the University.

Tell us a bit about your background, how long have you worked for West Yorkshire Police?

I have been a police officer for 7 years, working in west Leeds. I have worked mostly as a patrol officer going to ‘blue light’ jobs, however I have also worked on a neighbourhood policing team. This involved investigating crimes which required a long term problem solving approach.

What was it that attracted you to the role of Police Higher Education Liaison Officer?

The University is a small town, which requires a policing presence. I was attracted to the role due to being able to work as part of a large team full of people with skills from all different walks of life. The student population in Leeds is huge and having the opportunity to be based on campus alongside both students and staff will hopefully give them a safe learning and working environment.

Could you explain a little bit more about your role, and how it helps staff and students at the University?

I am based in the Security Office and work alongside the campus security team. My role involves investigating crimes that have taken place on campus, alongside offering support, advice and guidance to students and staff. I have an open door policy so anyone can drop in when I am at work and I will happily assist where I can. Often people choose to speak to me anonymously for advice so they can make a fully informed decision prior to reporting something to the police.

As I am the liaison officer between the University of Leeds and West Yorkshire Police, I will often take statements and speak with staff and students about matters that have taken place off campus to assist my colleagues.

What are the main things you’re hoping to achieve in your time as Police Higher Education Liaison Officer?

I have come to the University at a very difficult time for everyone because of the covid-19 pandemic. My short term aim is to assist the University in keeping students safe during the pandemic. However, my main focus is to work closely with the security team to both detect and prevent crime to continue to make the University a safe place to both work and study.

What issues or problems would you recommend staff and students coming to talk to you about?

Anything you feel the police would be able to help with. If it turns out to be something that the police would not usually deal with, I will be able to assist you in finding the right department at the University to help you.

What advice would you have for students who have just moved to Leeds?

Leeds is a very big city with a lot to do. Unfortunately options are limited at the moment due to covid-19. However, hopefully, it won’t be forever and soon you’ll be able to take advantage of what Leeds has to offer.

Like other university cities, crimes do take place within student areas. However, there are things you can do to try and prevent yourself from becoming a victim of crime:

  • Lock your doors (even when you are at home)
  • Keep all valuables out of sight
  • Do not walk across dark areas, such as Woodhouse Moor, alone.
How can staff or students get in touch with you?

You can email me C.Maude1@leeds.ac.uk, call me on 07525243483 or come to speak to me at the Security Office:

Security Services
University of Leeds
175 Woodhouse Lane
Leeds
LS2 9JT

 

Main campus electrical supply: Disruption expected in November / December

No electricity to campus – exact date to be confirmed.

UPDATE

This work has been cancelled for November/December and is now scheduled for early 2021.

During November or December there will be no electrical supply to the campus. The works will take place out of hours, during a weekend and we expect it to be several short durations of electrical disruptions in the night. Our reason for communicating this so early is to advise colleagues, who work with equipment sensitive to electrical supply interruptions, to consider and prepare for how this interruption to power may affect the equipment and their research.

Effects of the disruption:

  • No electricity, heating or hot water during the works

For enquiries please contact: Simon Gough, s.j.gough@leeds.ac.uk.

If the above member of staff is unavailable or you have any general queries about our services, please contact the Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 34 35555 or email: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

Thank you for your cooperation and we apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Bragg Tribute

Construction milestone around the corner for the Sir William Henry Bragg Building

As we move ever closer to the completion of the construction of the Sir William Henry Bragg building we spoke to Estates Senior Project Manager David Oldroyd to find out about the next steps for the project.

For additional information about the project why not read the FAQ’s for the Sir William Henry Bragg Building.

When does construction complete?

We’re really pleased to confirm that construction is due to be complete in February 2021, approximately in four months’ time.

That’s not long, what will be happening in the last phase of construction?

Your right, it will be upon us before we know it. At the moment the project Contractor BAM, is focusing on the key aspects which are the ongoing installation of lab furniture, laying of soft floor finishes and the final decorations in addition to completing other smaller aspects of the construction programme. The last four weeks of construction will be commissioning of services only and by Christmas, all physical works involving tradesmen will be complete.

What can we expect following construction?

Following the completion of building construction the next phase is called fit out, hook-up and migration.

This phase involves the practical elements of installing fixtures and fittings and specialist connections inside to enable equipment from the current labs and buildings to be moved over/ migrated into the new building. It is envisaged that this process will take approximately six months. During this time we will also be installing furniture and completing the AV installations in the building.

Sounds great, and when can we expect staff to move into the building?

Our plans for general staff moving into the building will occur after the summer teaching term completes in 2021 but more precise details will follow nearer the time.

In the current climate, the safety of our staff and students remains a priority so we will seek to move staff in when it is effectively safe to do so next year in controlled phases of work.

Where can we find out more about the project?

We post regular updates about the project on the campus development website. You can visit it to see progress photos of the building, both internal and external. We also have an FAQ’s section which covers everything from what happens after construction to specific information relevant to the staff that will be moving into the building.

We are also keen to hear from colleagues who may have additional comments or questions. Please contact us at campusdevelopment@leeds.ac.uk.

University Road: 2 – 13 October 2020

From Friday 2 October there will be NPg repair works on University Road.

From 8:00 – 16:00 from 2 – 13 October, NPg will be working outside Lifton Villas and The Logic Centre on University Road to repair on of their cables.

Effects of the disruption:

  • Noise and dust during excavation works
  • University Road will be reduced to a single lane with traffic control measures in place

For enquiries please contact: Rob Lindop, NPg on 07968609044.

If the above member of staff is unavailable or you have any general queries about our services, please contact the Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 34 35555 or email: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

Thank you for your cooperation and we apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Astbury Building at the University of Leeds

Re-opening our buildings

We’ve been busy over the last few months preparing to re-open our buildings and make them covid-secure.

Returning buildings to operation is a complex process, involving numerous teams and is governed by health and safety legislation. Whilst this isn’t a linear process the information below outlines the various stages we need to go through to ensure a building is safe to occupy.

  • Technical compliance: Includes fires and smoke checks, electrical compliance, lifts, mechanical equipment tests. This usually takes around four weeks.
  • Water compliance: Includes water quality testing and water hygiene (legionella) testing. This usually takes between three and six weeks. Find out what happens if a water test fails.
  • Health and safety measures: Covid-19 compliance including installation of social distancing signage, hand sanitiser dispensers stations.
  • Building cleaning: Thorough clean and service of buildings.
  • Final sign-off: Following the completion of health and safety checks and a visit from the Trade Union each building is signed off by the Re-entry Steering Group.

The Estates and Facilities Services have been crucial at every stage of the process.

Len Wilson, Deputy Director of Estates (Capital): ‘Ensuring our buildings are safe and secure in line with Public Health Guidelines has been a significant team effort. Services from Health, Safety and Wellbeing, Estates and Facilities and colleagues from specific Schools and Faculties have all come together to ensure our buildings are safe for when our staff and students return. It has been a lengthy and complex process but we can reassure those staff and students returning to campus that our open buildings are safe.’

The majority of staff are still working from home with a lot of teaching being delivered online. Learn more about how the University is reopening buildings.