Security Services leaving a helping hand flyer on an unattended iPad

Security giving you a helping hand

Security Services are starting a new campaign to give you a helping hand with keeping your property safe. From Monday 20 January, Security started to place new hand-shaped flyers on any unattended property in public spaces around campus to highlight the risk of opportunistic theft.

Whilst campus is generally a safe and secure space, it is also important to understand that there is always a risk of crime in a big city like Leeds and you need to take steps to protect yourself from it. You probably take your laptop and phone down to the library to study most days. If you leave them unattended to nip away for a coffee, then you could have lost hundreds if not thousands of pounds worth of items by the time you get back.

We’re hoping that if you come back to see one of our helping hands on your stuff, then you’ll realise it would’ve only taken seconds for it to have been stolen.

– Andy Gordon-Platt, Crime Prevention Advisor

Andy Gordon-Platt, the University’s Crime Prevention Advisor, came up with the concept for the ‘helping hand’, “The police had a similar anti-burglary campaign a few years ago. I thought that a version of this could make a real impact on reducing opportunistic theft within our public spaces. We’re hoping that if you come back to see one of our helping hands on your stuff, then you’ll realise it would’ve only taken seconds for it to have been stolen. With our officers’ regular uniformed patrols of campus, students are also able to ask questions about how they can best protect their property.”

If you want to know more about security on campus and how to keep yourself and your property safe, then why not visit the Security drop-in sessions in the LUU Foyer? They’re 11am – 2pm, Tuesdays and Thursdays and you’ll be able to speak with the Police Higher Education Liaison Officer, PC Becky Hurrell, the Crime Prevention Advisor, Andy Gordon-Platt, and the on-duty operations manager. For further information and advice, visit leeds.ac.uk/security.

Completed Language Centre in the Parkinson Building

Language Centre transformation speaks volumes

Language Centre staff and students have moved back ‘home’ into Parkinson after a 15-month construction project to transform facilities in the iconic building.

Refurbishment of levels two and three provide high quality facilities for learning and teaching, including the Centre’s area for independent language learning, which is available to all staff and students.

It also provides workspace for colleagues comprising the Centre for Excellence in Language Teaching in the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies.

The project has been designed to maximise space while highlighting key features of this historic building, also retaining the Centre as a key gateway to the University for many international students.

New facilities provide a modern and attractive learning environment.

The third floor is now exclusively for Language Centre colleagues and comprises office and meeting space, while the second floor has been reconfigured to be student facing, including:

  • a new Language Centre reception and Student Support Office
  • a reconfigured Language Zone entrance
  • five rooms for small group teaching, complete with lecture capture facilities; and
  • three technology enhanced rooms for innovation in language teaching.

Rupert Herington, Deputy Director, Language Centre, said: “After 15 months elsewhere on campus, we are very pleased to be back in the Parkinson building and very happy with how the two floors have been transformed.”

Other features of the development include:

  • refurbished common and pastoral areas
  • improved signage throughout the Centre
  • new ‘breakout’ areas and private seating booths for group or individual study
  • additional meeting and consultation rooms
  • new staff facilities, including kitchen areas and ‘breakout’ space; and
  • improved lighting and ventilation to provide a more comfortable and energy-efficient environment.

Penny Tiffney, Senior Interior Architectural Designer in Estates, said: “The success of the completed scheme, is a direct result of a collaboration and frequent communication between the Estates team, our consultants, the contractor and the stakeholders. The focus was on the details and that is evident in the elegance of the completed scheme.

“The existing structure, with its heavy masonry brickwork, initially offered its challenges, but our design consultants, Associated Architects, worked with the structural grid to create new spaces that complimented the rhythm of this Grade II listed building.

“The essence of the specified interior finishes was to compliment the original aesthetics. The original parquet, walnut doors and brass ironmongery were restored, in part, or recreated to match existing. And the new colour palette was subtle and muted, so as not to detract from original architectural features.”

Information on recent improvements by Security Services

Security Services – We Are Listening

The Security Services recently sent out a survey as part of our Secured Environments accreditation, and it was great to receive such a large and positive response to our work. However as a service we recognise that there is always room to improve how we operate, and so we wanted to take this opportunity to let you know about some changes that we hope will make further improvements to how safe and secure everyone feels on campus.

The Team

In 2019 the Security Service has recruited nine staff and has returned in the main to an in house team. We recognise staff feedback, that knowledge and having consistent staff on shift provides reassurance and a better quality of service. In addition to the increase in Security employed officers we also have a full time training officer who is responsible for delivering a robust induction training programme, refresher training as well as continual development of our officers throughout the year. If you think there is something about your work area or building that you think our officers need to know please get in touch with the Head of Security who will be more than happy to arrange for the training officer to come and talk to you. We still work in partnership with an agency provider for some specific activities or at peak times of the year and agency staff provider are also supported by our in house training officer. We are also delighted to have increased our dog handling provision to every shift and have four new canine recruits Ruby, Reggie, Enzo and Tia who undertaking their first year of West Yorkshire Police Dog Training, please look out for them on campus.

New Roles

To increase the level of management support in our service we have introduced in new Duty Operations Management Roles within the Security Service. The four Duty Operations Managers are each responsible for a team of security officers on a day to day basis. Regular scheduled meetings with the Deputy Security Services Manager, enables them to help us review and improve our processes, discuss customer feedback and continuous improvement, whilst also receiving the latest information from the management team. This two-way communication helps to ensure that all teams are able to provide a consistent high standard of service.

Another way this communication is enabled is through the weekly Monday morning meetings between the Deputy Security Manager and the different security teams. These meetings enable Mark to update the security officers with topical, relevant information and give the officers a chance to feedback and queries or issues that they have.

Security Patrols

Security undertake structured patrols around campus, officers take pre-planned routes making sure they engage with staff and students as they patrol. Officers have their own designated regular routes, and will introduce themselves to reception and front of house staff as they patrol inside their buildings. We recognise that staff feel reassured seeing our officers out on patrol and we hope that staff will get more opportunities to know who the officers for their buildings are. This will also ensure a consistent level of service for staff across campus, as they will be interacting with the same well-trained, motivated and friendly security officers each day.

Improving Communications

Over the next few months the Deputy Security Services Manager will be meeting with the Facilities Manager of each faculty to discuss a range of different security matters. These meetings will include explaining the recent improvements to security and informing them about the availability of the critical incidents poster, which gives guidance on how to react in the unlikely event of an emergency incident on campus. Another key matter that will be discussed in these meetings is locking and access to buildings on campus. This was an area where some concerns were raised during the recent survey, so we will seek to understand where colleagues have feedback and work with them to address.

As well as these meetings, we’re keen to hear any further comments or suggestions about security on campus from all staff. If there is any feedback you would like to provide, then please email it to securitycomments@leeds.ac.uk. If the matter is urgent you will receive a response within 24 hours, or within five working days for less urgent enquiries.

If you have any questions around security we would encourage you to come along to our drop-in sessions at Leeds University Union. These are in the LUU foyer on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11am – 2pm. PC Becky Hurrell, the Police Higher Education Liaison Officer, Andy Gordon Platt, Crime Prevention Advisor, and the on-duty operations manager will all be present to speak with you.

Parkinson accessible seating area

Makeover for University’s main entrances

A large project to improve the look and general accessibility around the main entrance to the University has now been completed. Previously the area where the Michael Sadler Building meets the side of the Parkinson Building had sloping feathered steps on one side, and uneven ground without a clear pathway on the other. These feathered steps have been removed and replaced with a green area featuring a newly planted semi-mature tree. On the other side, the seating area has been redone with more attractive furniture, improved landscaping and clear accessible routes to allow easy access from Woodhouse Lane onto University Road. This includes removing a threshold step that made access under the archway difficult and could force people off the path and into the road.

The works are a continuation of the project that has made the Parkinson Building more accessible than ever. The steps have been replaced, handrails have been put in place and a new lift has been installed. This means that for the first time in its history it will be possible for all visitors, students and staff to enter the Parkinson Building together using the main entrance.

Dr Angharad Beckett, Associate Professor of Political Sociology and Joint Director of the Centre for Disability Studies, said:

“I felt that I just must write to say thank you for the fantastic development of the Parkinson Building Main Entrance. The lift for wheelchair users, or anyone who cannot climb the steps, is wonderful. My students (past and present) in Disability Studies, plus the wider community of scholars and activists in this area in Leeds and beyond are delighted to see it. They have observed that it is both beautiful and functional.

The reaction has been that it conveys a powerful message about diversity and inclusion at this University. No longer will those with mobility impairments enter the iconic building of the University via a side entrance (’round the side’). Now they will enter via the front door, like everyone else.

This is so important and something we are celebrating.”

Cycle awareness campaign

Cycle Awareness Campaign – 7 and 8 October

Security Services, in partnership with West Yorkshire Police and Leeds City Connect, will launch a new cycle campaign in October aimed at promoting bike security to new students in Leeds.

Security Services will be promoting two strands of cycle safety and security. For just £20 students can buy:

  • a solid D-Lock
  • front and rear lights for their bikes

Malcolm Dawson, Security Services Manager, said“This campaign is aimed at improving cycle safety and security across campus and follows on from last year’s successful campaign.”

Why is cycle safety and security important?

  • A good solid D-Lock makes it much harder for thieves to steal cycles and they usually go for those that are not secured properly or those with rather flimsy locks.
  • Unfortunately, accidents occur with cyclists often riding with no lights during darkness and front and rear lights will be supplied in the package.

Download the poster

We will be on the Precinct (opposite the Union) between 8.30am and 4pm on Monday 7 and Tuesday 8 October. Students should head down to pick up a secure D-lock and a bike light set for just £20, whilst stocks last.  For further details contact m.dawson@leeds.ac.ukor crimeprevention@leeds.ac.uk

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Car Park

British Parking Awards Nomination 2019

Colleagues from the University of Leeds Car Parking team attended the British Parking Awards in March.

The awards recognise the leading examples of car park management, enforcement, design and team work, and are often noted as being the Oscars of the car parking world!

Our Car Parking team came runners up in the Intelligent Parking category. Support Services Manager, Majid Khan said: “For a Higher Education institution to be recognised in this category is a great achievement. I am proud of my team in delivering a fantastic service to our customers. Who knew that the University could reach the dizzying heights of the British Parking Awards!”

Find out more about the new Facilities management system

New Facilities management system

The University has made a substantial investment into a new computer-aided facilities management (CAFM) software system.

This system will enable Estates Services to work more efficiently and effectively to deliver improved customer service. The system, which is computer based, will be used to maintain and improve the condition of the University’s buildings and assets to a standard that meets statutory compliance whilst minimising costs. It will ensure our staff within the DLO (Direct Labour Organisation) can maximise both reactive and planned maintenance. It will also help us improve our processes as we will have a single database that will hold records of the University Estate to enable effective management of University assets – providing an improved service to students and staff, with minimal disruption.

For our customers this will mean an improved service for maintenance work – the new automated system will allow us to be more reactive to customer needs.

Matthew Tidmarsh, Deputy Director – Operations at the University of Leeds, explains: “This system represents a significant business process change for the Facilities Directorate and especially Estates Services at the University of Leeds. It will help transform the way in which we manage and deliver a wide range of our services and its potential impact shouldn’t be underestimated. For our customers this will mean an improved service for maintenance work – the new automated system will allow us to be more reactive to customer needs.”

The benefits of this system will include:

  • Improved Estates Helpdesk Facility
  • Mobile technology to improve reactive maintenance
  • Integrated and improved management of University spaces
  • Improved management information about the campus and other University assets.
  • Estates Service will become more streamlined with operational and maintenance activities.

Next steps

The implementation phase will begin in July with 50 users in the first rollout. They will be members of staff based in Estates, more specifically Maintenance and Operations.

For further details on this project contact:

Russell Allen
CAFM Project Manager
r.allen2@leeds.ac.uk

Times Higher Education - Top 2

Campus facilities ranked top two in UK

The University of Leeds has risen to third place in the UK in the Times Higher Education Student Survey, which asks students about their experience while studying, and placed second for its campus facilities.

The survey goes beyond the usual measures to ask students about the details of university life that matter to them the most. Leeds is the highest-ranked among the Russell Group of research-intensive universities and also scored highly for its campus environment and extra-curricular activities.

The University was ranked second for its facilities, up one place from last year’s third position. Since the last survey, we’ve seen many developments on campus improving student facilities such as the £24.7m refurbishment of the Edward Boyle Library and the opening of the £5m Brownlee Centre and Cycle Circuit, plus refurbishments of the Leeds University Union and the School of Chemical and Process Engineering, in addition to further investments in our central teaching spaces.

Professor Tom Ward, Deputy-Vice-Chancellor: Student Education said: “This position is a wonderful tribute to the staff and students that make Leeds what it is: a University that excels in the quality of its teaching, its research, its international offer and – as this result testifies – in the way it nurtures its students by creating a supportive and friendly environment.

“The key is working together. We might have one of the largest campuses in the UK but we foster a small community feel. I think it’s something that we do very well indeed, and it’s great to receive this endorsement from our students.”

Read more about the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey and the University’s ranking here.

Defibrillators on Campus

Defibrillators installed on campus

Lifesaving defibrillators installed on Campus

17 new locations have been identified for the installation of lifesaving defibrillators across the University Campus. This is part of the University’s on-going commitment to improve health and safety provision on campus for staff, students and the wider local community, and now takes the provision of defibrillators on campus to 30. The new locations are detailed below and have been added to the campus map (click on the facilities tab) making it easier for anyone to locate their nearest defibrillator location.

  • Reception in CAPE
  • Outside Roger Stevens
  • Outside the Facilities Directorate building
  • Outside the multi-storey car park
  • Outside the Psychology building
  • Outside Pure Café, level 9 in Worsley
  • Miall reception
  • Conference Auditorium
  • In the reception areas of Charles Morris
  • In the reception area of Central Village
  • In the reception area of Devonshire Hall
  • Outside Fairbairn House Clarendon Road
Defibrillators in the following locations will be installed in the coming months.
  • In the courtyard of Clothworkers Court
  • In the reception area of Sir William Henry Bragg Building
  • In the reception area of NEXUS
  • Outside the reception area of Henry Price
  • Sports Park Weetwood to cover pitches and public access areas

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of premature death. SCA occurs because the electrical rhythm that controls the heart is interrupted. A defibrillator is a device that gives a high energy electric shock to the heart through the chest walls to someone who is in cardiac arrest. This high energy shock is called defibrillation. The quicker the patient can be given shocks in combination with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the greater the chance of successful resuscitation.

Defibrillators are easy to use and are very effective. They are designed to be used by anyone so training is not required. A defibrillator unit will issue verbal instructions and guide the user through its use. The units will not issue a shock unless the heart requires it – therefore they are safe to use and cannot be used on someone who is not experiencing SCA. Additionally, the units themselves require very little routine maintenance.

If you are faced with an emergency follow these steps:

  1. Call the University Security Services Team on 0113 343 2222 and Emergency Services on 999.
  2. Follow their instructions, they will give you the code to open the external Defibrillator cabinet. Internal cabinets have no locks fitted and can be accessed directly in the event of an emergency but Security Services MUST also be called.
  3. Seek help from another person to commence cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) while the defibrillator is obtained. If you are alone, commence CPR if confident to do so, and await the arrival of Security Services.
  4. Follow the instructions on how to use the defibrillator, a colleague from Security Services will arrive to assist at the scene.

Dennis Hopper, Director Campus Development said: “Strengthening the provision of defibrillators and increasing their accessibility across campus is a major step forward for the University. They have been located in publicly accessible areas of all large multi-floor buildings, and externally across campus which are easily accessible for all other buildings. They are bright and noticeable which makes them easy to identify in an emergency. I’d advise staff and students, if they see a defibrillator located on campus, to stop a moment and familiarise themselves with the instructions printed on the outside casing.

“We are grateful for the partnership with Yorkshire Ambulance Service, who have been highly supportive of our ambition to increase the number of defibrillators across the campus. The Service advised us on how best to proceed in terms of the distribution of the defibrillators across campus to ensure that all areas were covered and that travel times to access a defibrillator were kept to an acceptable reasonable minimum. We have registered the defibrillators on the NHS regional database, which means, when the ambulance service is contacted in an emergency, they are able to immediately inform the caller of the nearest defibrillator unit.”

Learn how to perform CPR and AED

If you are interested in training to perform CPR and use automated defibrillators go along to the Restart a Heart Day event, hosted by Leeds Medical Students, on 10 October outside Leeds University Union.

This is a voluntary group of 40 Leeds medical students who are trained by Yorkshire Ambulance Service as Community First Responders (CFRs). The group aims to have a pair on-call close to 24/7 to then be dispatched to high priority 999 calls in the local area ahead of ambulance crews. The group is also increasingly involved in outreach and education, both on and off campus. At the event, staff and students will be taught how to perform CPR and use an AED