Times Higher Education - Top 2

Campus facilities ranked top two in UK

The University of Leeds has risen to third place in the UK in the Times Higher Education Student Survey, which asks students about their experience while studying, and placed second for its campus facilities.

The survey goes beyond the usual measures to ask students about the details of university life that matter to them the most. Leeds is the highest-ranked among the Russell Group of research-intensive universities and also scored highly for its campus environment and extra-curricular activities.

The University was ranked second for its facilities, up one place from last year’s third position. Since the last survey, we’ve seen many developments on campus improving student facilities such as the £24.7m refurbishment of the Edward Boyle Library and the opening of the £5m Brownlee Centre and Cycle Circuit, plus refurbishments of the Leeds University Union and the School of Chemical and Process Engineering, in addition to further investments in our central teaching spaces.

Professor Tom Ward, Deputy-Vice-Chancellor: Student Education said: “This position is a wonderful tribute to the staff and students that make Leeds what it is: a University that excels in the quality of its teaching, its research, its international offer and – as this result testifies – in the way it nurtures its students by creating a supportive and friendly environment.

“The key is working together. We might have one of the largest campuses in the UK but we foster a small community feel. I think it’s something that we do very well indeed, and it’s great to receive this endorsement from our students.”

Read more about the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey and the University’s ranking here.

Defibrillators on Campus

Defibrillators installed on campus

Lifesaving defibrillators installed on Campus

17 new locations have been identified for the installation of lifesaving defibrillators across the University Campus. This is part of the University’s on-going commitment to improve health and safety provision on campus for staff, students and the wider local community, and now takes the provision of defibrillators on campus to 30. The new locations are detailed below and have been added to the campus map (click on the facilities tab) making it easier for anyone to locate their nearest defibrillator location.

  • Reception in CAPE
  • Outside Roger Stevens
  • Outside the Facilities Directorate building
  • Outside the multi-storey car park
  • Outside the Psychology building
  • Outside Pure Café, level 9 in Worsley
  • Miall reception
  • Conference Auditorium
  • In the reception areas of Charles Morris
  • In the reception area of Central Village
  • In the reception area of Devonshire Hall
  • Outside Fairbairn House Clarendon Road
Defibrillators in the following locations will be installed in the coming months.
  • In the courtyard of Clothworkers Court
  • In the reception area of Sir William Henry Bragg Building
  • In the reception area of NEXUS
  • Outside the reception area of Henry Price
  • Sports Park Weetwood to cover pitches and public access areas

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of premature death. SCA occurs because the electrical rhythm that controls the heart is interrupted. A defibrillator is a device that gives a high energy electric shock to the heart through the chest walls to someone who is in cardiac arrest. This high energy shock is called defibrillation. The quicker the patient can be given shocks in combination with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the greater the chance of successful resuscitation.

Defibrillators are easy to use and are very effective. They are designed to be used by anyone so training is not required. A defibrillator unit will issue verbal instructions and guide the user through its use. The units will not issue a shock unless the heart requires it – therefore they are safe to use and cannot be used on someone who is not experiencing SCA. Additionally, the units themselves require very little routine maintenance.

If you are faced with an emergency follow these steps:

  1. Call the University Security Services Team on 0113 343 2222 and Emergency Services on 999.
  2. Follow their instructions, they will give you the code to open the external Defibrillator cabinet. Internal cabinets have no locks fitted and can be accessed directly in the event of an emergency but Security Services MUST also be called.
  3. Seek help from another person to commence cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) while the defibrillator is obtained. If you are alone, commence CPR if confident to do so, and await the arrival of Security Services.
  4. Follow the instructions on how to use the defibrillator, a colleague from Security Services will arrive to assist at the scene.

Dennis Hopper, Director Campus Development said: “Strengthening the provision of defibrillators and increasing their accessibility across campus is a major step forward for the University. They have been located in publicly accessible areas of all large multi-floor buildings, and externally across campus which are easily accessible for all other buildings. They are bright and noticeable which makes them easy to identify in an emergency. I’d advise staff and students, if they see a defibrillator located on campus, to stop a moment and familiarise themselves with the instructions printed on the outside casing.

“We are grateful for the partnership with Yorkshire Ambulance Service, who have been highly supportive of our ambition to increase the number of defibrillators across the campus. The Service advised us on how best to proceed in terms of the distribution of the defibrillators across campus to ensure that all areas were covered and that travel times to access a defibrillator were kept to an acceptable reasonable minimum. We have registered the defibrillators on the NHS regional database, which means, when the ambulance service is contacted in an emergency, they are able to immediately inform the caller of the nearest defibrillator unit.”

Learn how to perform CPR and AED

If you are interested in training to perform CPR and use automated defibrillators go along to the Restart a Heart Day event, hosted by Leeds Medical Students, on 10 October outside Leeds University Union.

This is a voluntary group of 40 Leeds medical students who are trained by Yorkshire Ambulance Service as Community First Responders (CFRs). The group aims to have a pair on-call close to 24/7 to then be dispatched to high priority 999 calls in the local area ahead of ambulance crews. The group is also increasingly involved in outreach and education, both on and off campus. At the event, staff and students will be taught how to perform CPR and use an AED

Roger Stevent Cooling pond

Exciting improvement plans for the Roger Stevens Cooling Pond

Work has begun at the Roger Stevens cooling pond as part of a multi-disciplinary University project, that will not only visually enhance the landscape outside the Roger Stevens Building, but will also provide research led teaching opportunities for our students.

This innovative project has been led by Estates Services and has involved The Leeds Living Lab, in collaboration with colleagues from University–wide departments including, Sustainability, and Schools of Biology, Geography and Civil Engineering. Teams worked together to co-create a solution for the Roger Stevens pond that enhances amenity value, enhances biodiversity, improves natural water quality, reduces operational cost and provides an innovative space for interdisciplinary, research-led teaching.

The installation of sensors within the pool will also provide live data on water quality and a variety of environmental parameters, this will be made available to staff and students for teaching and research use.

Roger Stevens pond

Leonard Wilson, Deputy Director for Estates Services commented:“The scheme has been designed to create an extra ‘green’ dimension to this part of the campus and help biodiversity in the area. Once the planting has been established and the neutrality of the water is in balance, it is also hoped to introduce fish to the pond.The duck house will also continue to remain at the pond side, and we envisage they too will benefit from the new improved environment.  This year we had two broods, which have now flown south, but we look forward to welcoming them back in the spring when the pool will be more established and flourishing.”

The Leeds Living Lab drives the University’s commitment to embedding sustainability through knowledge, engagement, collaboration and innovation. It brings together students, academic and operational staff to research and test sustainable solutions, enhance our curriculum and solve real world challenges using the University as a test-bed.

A Living Lab Placement Student in the School of Biology, will ensure that staff and students can access to data for teaching and research use. It also seeks to be a centre of academic research such as a recently started study into the effects of the water body on the heat island effect of the surrounding architecture.

With connections to Undergraduate and Postgraduate teaching modules in all the Schools involved, the collaborative approach has sought to ensure the pond can meet the demands of student assessed projects, field practice and dissertations whilst also delivering an innovative, sustainable solution as part of the University Landscape Strategy.