Representatives from the University, BAM and architect design team at the Bragg project event

University’s new building reaches its summit

The construction of the new Sir William Henry Bragg building at the University of Leeds celebrated a milestone today, as the building reached its tallest point.

To mark the occasion a special “Topping Out” event took place. University colleagues were joined by representatives from main contractor BAM Construction and architect design team ADP, BAM Design, Arcadis, Gardiner & Theobald, ARUP and Silcock Leedham.

Colleagues watched as the building’s plant room was lifted onto the roof, forming the highest point of the new building. The plant for this technologically advanced new building is complex, and BAM has assembled the plant room off-site in a factory environment, with the support of local Leeds company Waites Mechanical Services, saving time and cost on the project.

Set to open its doors to students in 2021, the new building represents a significant investment by the University in a new integrated campus for Engineering and Physical Sciences. The facility will include first-class laboratory and specialised teaching spaces, enabling cutting-edge research, and outstanding student experience, whilst enhancing the University’s research power and strengthening collaboration with industry.

Steve Gilley, Director of Estates and Facilities said:

“I’d like to thank all of our partners who have contributed to this flagship project to date. It’s important to mark key milestones, and recognise the importance of the expertise from extended project teams, to ensure the successful construction of this new facility.”

For BAM Construction, John Phillips said:

“Topping out is a centuries old tradition, and this year BAM is 150 years old, while the University’s origins date back to a similar time, to 1874. Today we are both known for being leaders in modern technology. The University is looking to the future, and BAM are delighted to be helping them to create facilities for the next generations of students and academics.”

Joe Morgan, Director, ADP said:

“This project was conceived in 2015 as a critical component of the strategic masterplan, to create a collaborative hub for computing and physical sciences. The building champions the need to address tomorrow’s challenges whilst minimising its impact on the environment, so it is appropriate that one of the components designed to make this building so highly energy efficient should be lowered into place as part of the ‘topping out’ celebration.”

Ian Aldous, Director, Arcadis said:

The scale of this project – from the stakeholder engagement through to the design solution and delivery – has been immense and everyone involved has been on a real journey. As such, to see the critical milestone being reached is hugely satisfying for all involved, and a testimony to the dedication of all parties to the future vision.

Colleagues watch as the plant room is craned to the roof of the Sir William Henry Bragg Building project

 

No access to the Chemistry Building via St George’s Field: 9 – 16 December 2019

There will be no access to the Chemistry Building via St George’s Field from Monday 9 December – Monday 16 December. 

BAM will be removing the steel stair from St George’s Field coming down to their scaffold tunnel outside the Chemistry Building as part of the Sir William Henry Bragg Building project. Pedestrians who use St George’s Field to access the School of Chemistry will have to use an alternative route.

For enquiries please contact: Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 345555 or email: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

Thank you for your cooperation and we apologise for any inconvenience caused.

 

Bragg crane view

Sir William Henry Bragg Building: Update

In January, our contractor, BAM, invited us up the crane at the Sir William Henry Bragg Building site to see how the project is progressing. Temporary foundation structural posts are in place and steelwork can now begin.

This £96m investment will create a culture of inter-disciplinary working. The facility will include first-class laboratory and specialised teaching spaces, enabling cutting-edge research, and outstanding student experience. Whilst enhancing the University’s research power and strengthening collaboration with industry.

While we were up there we also captured some great shots of Leeds and campus in the winter sun!

 

 

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Bragg Artwork Building

New eye-catching scientific sculpture

A dramatic sculpture honouring revolutionary science will be in a prominent position on the side of the new Engineering and Physical Sciences development.

The two-storey artwork by Sara Barker has been granted approval by Leeds City Council planning department. The sculpture will feature on the outside of the Sir William Henry Bragg Building, which is under construction in Woodhouse Lane. It honours Sir William’s pioneering research in developing X-ray crystallography at the University in the early 20th century. Bragg and his son Lawrence were awarded the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics for their work. Within the sculpture lies symbolism that alludes to the Bragg equation, which explains the relationship between X-rays directed onto a crystal and their diffraction from the crystal, allowing the atomic structure of materials to be investigated. Parts of the sculpture will be finished with iridescent paint which refracts light rather than creating colour by pigment, so it changes colour as viewed from different angles. This type of iridescent paint was developed by Professor Helen Gleeson, the current Cavendish Professor of Physics at Leeds – the same position held by Bragg in his day.


The new building is due to open in late summer 2020. The dramatic sculpture reflects the University’s ambition to deliver a step change in the research activity in engineering and physical sciences, to enhance a culture of multi-disciplinary working, and support significant advances in our understanding of the physical world. The artwork physically refuses to be pinned down by media, sitting between the qualities of drawing, collage, textile, painting, and sculpture. It draws our eye to shapes and symbols suspended in a delicately woven metal tableau.

Sara Barker said: “I want the sculptural language to shout out to the powerful advances happening in the physical sciences at the University, and also to the rich history of the University in its broadest sense, for the sculpture to reveal itself over time and become part of the fabric of the building. I hope the forms found in the sculpture provoke questions, as people discover the scientific lettering of Bragg’s famous equation, and also a more patterned and playful narrative of molecular and textile and crystallographic structure. But frankly, this is an artwork and it has to be captivating on a level we can’t articulate, and as an artist, the moment of truth is in seeing ideas thought through by hand in the studio, tactile and intimate, forcibly evolve into the monumental and concrete.”

Dr Jim Young, Programme Director for the building at the University of Leeds says: “We are extremely pleased with the news that this beautiful artwork has received planning permission from the city council. It is a unique and intelligent piece of art and I look forward to seeing it in all its glory.”


Sara Barker was born in Manchester in 1980. She was educated at Glasgow School of Art and University of Glasgow. Significant solo exhibitions include The faces of older images, Mary Mary, Glasgow (2017), a weak spot in the earth, The Approach, London (2017)  CHANGE-THE-SETTING, The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh (2016). Past commissions include Last of Light (3 needles) Angel Court Piazza, London (2017), warp- and weft-, CASS Sculpture Foundation, Goodwood, West Sussex (2015). She will also be working with Leeds Art Gallery (2020) to coincide with the new commission at the University.

 

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Bragg building new header

Information event: Sir William Henry Bragg Building

Date: Wednesday 21 March
Time:  2-4pm
Venue: Lecture Theatre G35, School of Chemistry

This information event is of a general nature and aimed at all staff and students across the University. Please click here to book your place.

As part of the University’s continuing investment in the campus, a new building – the Sir William Henry Bragg Building – is being built situated between the Schools of Chemistry and Electronic & Electrical Engineering on the northeast side of the campus.

Construction starts in late May 2018 and the new building will be completed in summer 2020.

This is a hugely important and exciting development for the University and we’re keen to inform and update you on the plans and progress to date and answer any questions you may have.  

The £96 million building is the largest single investment to date in the University’s estate and will become home to the Schools of Computing and Physics & Astronomy, with direct links to the School of Chemistry and Faculty of Engineering, forming an integrated campus of engineering and physical sciences.

The Sir William Henry Bragg Building will provide an exceptional environment for collaborative research, with high specification laboratories and facilities, and enhanced teaching space.

The building will also incorporate the Bragg Centre for Materials Research which will bring together researchers from schools across the University campus and beyond to create an environment that will foster ground-breaking, interdisciplinary research to accelerate impact on society.

If you have any further enquiries please contact campusdevelopment@leeds.ac.uk.

Disruptions featured image

Important Communication for Disabled Staff, Students and Visitors regarding Woodhouse Lane and Chemistry West: Disruption 5 March Until 2020

Date of disruption: from Monday 5 March until summer 2020

Work begins to prepare for the construction of the Sir William Henry Bragg Building.

Effects of these works: On 5 March, construction company BAM will erect new hoardings along Woodhouse Lane. This will result in disrupted walking routes and some potential traffic delays along Woodhouse Lane. Full construction work will commence late May and will be on site for two years.

For disabled staff, this will mean: There will no longer be staff parking bays or a taxi drop off point outside Chemistry West. Dedicated parking spaces for disabled staff are now located at Cloth Workers Central.

For disabled students, this will mean: The most direct route to Disability Services will be from University Road entrance, up from Cloth Workers buildings. However, this is closed until 26 March, due to urgent work being carried out by Yorkshire Water.

Directions:

  1. Travel down Clarendon Road from Woodhouse Lane.
  2. You will drive past the University Road junction off Clarendon Road, this is currently closed until 26 March, so please keep going down Clarendon Road. (Once the Univerity Road junction re-opens cars will be able to turn left on to University Road, from Clarendon Road and drive straight down to Cloth Workers Central Building.)
  3. Keep going down Clarendon Road until you reach Mount Preston Street on your left-hand side. Turn on to Mount Preston Street.
  4. Take the first left on to Cromer Terrace.
  5. Then second left on to Cloberry Street.
  6. Second right on to Clarendon Place.
  7. Then first left and first right on to Lyddon Terrace.
  8. Drive to the end of Lyddon Terrace then turn right on to University Road.
  9. Drive down University Road, you will pass the School of Fine Art on your left, drive under the bridge and you will arrive at Cloth Workers Central building on your left-hand side.
  10. Designated parking spaces are directly opposite Cloth Workers Central Building.
  11. Go through the Great Hall arches and follow the normal route to Disability Services office.

For disabled staff, students and visitors arriving by taxi and wishing to get to Disability Services this will mean:

Please ask your taxi driver to enter campus at the University Road entrance and follow the directions detailed above. These directions will take you to the designated disabled parking spaces at Cloth Workers South, where you can be safely dropped off.

If these changes affect appointments or visits to Disability Services please contact them directly by calling 0113 343 3927 or emailing disability@leeds.ac.uk.

Disruptions featured image

Construction of the Sir William Henry Bragg Building: Disruptions from 5 March Until 2020

Date of disruption: from Monday 5 March until summer 2020

Work begins to prepare for the construction of the Sir William Henry Bragg Building.

Effects of these works: On 5 March the construction company BAM will erect new hoardings along Woodhouse Lane. This will result in disrupted walking routes and some potential traffic delays along Woodhouse Lane. Full construction work will commence late May and will be on site for two years.

For staff and students this will mean: Some walking routes will be restricted during this period. There will no longer be a through route between the arches near the School of Chemistry to Woodhouse Lane. Please see the map below for more detail.

For deliveries this will mean: The delivery and exit routes near to the School of Chemistry will be under BAM’s control. When on site, BAM will guide delivery vehicles onto and off the site. 

Further information: Please bear with us as we deliver this significant project. The Sir William Henry Bragg Building is the largest single investment to date in our estate and will become home to the Schools of Computing and Physics and Astronomy, with direct links to the School of Chemistry and Faculty of Engineering.  The new building will incorporate the Bragg Centre for Materials Research, which will bring together researchers from schools across the University campus and beyond, to create an environment generating ground-breaking, interdisciplinary, research and to accelerate impact to society.

For enquiries please contact: David Oldroyd d.oldroyd@leeds.ac.uk

Contact Telephone No: 0113 43 35962

If the above member of staff is unavailable or you have any general queries about our services, please contact the Estate Services Helpdesk on 0113 345555 or email: eshelp@leeds.ac.uk

 

Thank you for your cooperation, we apologise for any inconvenience caused during the construction of this new building.

Bragg Tribute

Building a tribute to Sir William Henry Bragg

The University is to name a key building in its £96m investment in engineering and physical sciences in honour of one Leeds’ most influential scientists.

 

Sir William Henry Bragg won the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics with his son Sir William Lawrence Bragg, for the development of X-ray crystallography.

Their work revolutionised science by allowing researchers to examine the atomic structure of materials in detail for the first time.

Now the Sir William Henry Bragg Building will form a key part of the new developments on campus, which together with the Bragg Research Centre, which recognises both father and son, will bring researchers together to create a critical mass in ground-breaking interdisciplinary research and impact.

The name has been approved by Sir William’s family, with great grandson Charles Bragg highlighting his relative’s commitment to industry, and saying: “The Bragg family are sure Sir William would feel very honoured with this new building being named after him by the University of Leeds, given Leeds was where he did the fundamental work leading to the joint Nobel Prize for Physics in 1915.”

 

 

To read the full story, click here.

Find out more about the Integrated Campus for Engineering and Physical Sciences

  

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Old bar LUU

Leeds powers into top 10 Good University Guide

The University of Leeds has secured its place in the top 10 universities in the UK, according to The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018, published today.

Last year, Leeds was named University of the Year by the Guide, having been runner-up for the award in the previous two years.

The overall rankings for 2018, which are based on a range of metrics, sees Leeds rising to its highest-ever position, at number 10 in the UK.

Exceptional year for student experience

The University’s move into the top 10 is the latest recognition of its exceptional student education and all round student experience, combined with a strong research base.

Students voted Leeds in the top five universities in the UK in the 2017 Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey, where students from all over the world commended Leeds for its facilities, activities and societies, and student welfare and support.

Investing in quality

As part of its ambitious plans to maintain its position as one of the best universities in the UK, Leeds is investing £520 million in its campus, including major refurbishment of libraries, lecture theatres and the creation of new sports facilities.

Recent examples include the £17m upgrade of the Student Union to transform the social spaces, improve performance venues and extend facilities for societies. A new cycling track and sports centre, named after the Brownlee brothers who were former students at Leeds, officially opened earlier this year, to complement the state-of-the-art campus sports centre, The Edge.

Alistair and Jonny Brownlee opening the Brownlee Centre

Alistair and Jonny Brownlee open the new cycle circuit and Brownlee Centre at Bodington Playing Fields

A new undergraduate library, the Laidlaw Library, and a complete refurbishment of the Edward Boyle Library, have also created inspirational study environments, with group and silent study spaces, new cafes and IT-rich facilities. Leeds also excels at digital learning, as highlighted in its Gold standard teaching award, which praised Leeds for supporting students with “outstanding physical and digital resources.”

Reflecting the University’s ongoing commitment to life-changing research, the investment programme continues with the transformation of the Engineering and Physical Sciences environment, creating first-class laboratories and specialised teaching spaces for students.

The new enterprise and innovation centre, Nexus, will also provide crucial connections with industry, bringing students and business together to support access to wider opportunities through placements, internships and networking.

Read the full story at leeds.ac.uk

  

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Engineering and physical sciences

Green light for new £96m development

The University’s ambitious plans for advancing engineering and physical sciences has taken a major step forward today with a green light from Leeds City Council.

The £96m investment aims to provide an exceptional environment for students and support researchers from across engineering and physical sciences to work together to help solve fundamental problems and tackle key industry challenges.

Supporting the priorities of the Government’s Industrial Strategy and strengthening the University’s international reputation in interdisciplinary research, the investment is a key part of the University’s £520m campus development programme, aimed at securing Leeds’ position in the UK’s top 10 research universities.

To be completed by the summer 2020, the £96m development will relocate the School of Computing and School of Physics and Astronomy, bringing them together with colleagues in Chemistry and Engineering for the first time.

The investment will create state-of-the-art facilities that will rival the best in the UK and will include the new Bragg Research Centre for Advanced Functional Materials.

 

The Bragg Centre

The Bragg Centre for Advanced Functional Materials will be the new home for the University’s internationally-recognised activity in materials characterisation and analysis of soft matter and nanostructured thin films.

It is named after Sir William Henry Bragg, the early 20th century mathematician and physicist who developed X-Ray crystallography at Leeds, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1915 for his work together with his son Sir William Lawrence Bragg.

The Bragg Centre will also be the location for to the University’s research in functional materials and devices, which is part of the UK-wide Henry Royce Institute. This institute brings together world-leading academics from across the UK to study and develop advanced materials, with Leeds’ specialism in Atoms-to-Devices and the translation of new material systems from the atomic scale to operational device.

Professor Lisa Roberts, Deputy Vice-Chancellor: Research and Innovation, said: “The Bragg Centre’s interdisciplinary culture and state-of-the-art facilities will support and attract the best minds at all levels, placing our exceptional standard of research on a global scale.

“The Bragg Centre will be a fabulous environment for cross-disciplinary teams to work on big technical challenges, drawing on our existing strengths, while working together in new and disruptive ways to improve both the quality and the scale of our research; working in such an innovative environments will also transform how we can work with our industry partners on real world problems.”

 

Superlabs

The ‘superlabs’ concept behind the development will bring together existing strengths in applied and fundamental research to support interdisciplinary problem-solving research groups. They will tackle challenges facing the private sector and industry, from conception and theory to imaging, fabrication, application and translation.

Professor Steve Scott, Dean of the Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences, said: “We are creating an exceptional environment to carry out cutting-edge research; the interplay between people, working culture, equipment and buildings will be central to creating the highest quality findings and original ideas.

“The quality of our research, brought about through leading facilities and the exceptional breadth of our academic staff will drive external partnerships and attract international support, leading to greater depth in funding bids and a rise in standards of research.”

 

Research capability

The £96m complex is fully funded by the University of Leeds and will bring together existing scientific hardware from the schools involved. In addition, a significant strategic funding bid is being prepared for Research Councils to bring in the very latest equipment in a range of fields.

Areas of research it will support include energy efficient computing, telecommunications, sustainable magnetic materials, sensors for use in biological systems and extreme or remote environments, pharmaceutical formulations, ‘smart foods’ and medical technologies.

 

Benefits for students

The University’s undergraduate and thriving postgraduate and postdoctoral communities will also benefit, with the investment prioritising world-class teaching and laboratory spaces for research-based learning. The news comes as the University prepares to launch the Leeds Doctoral College, to further support postgraduate researchers.

Once completed, the development will host around 2,000 staff and students, who will study across the spectrum of physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and computer sciences.

Positioned on a prominent public-facing location of the campus in Woodhouse Lane, the proposed 15,700m2 building is the largest, single-project investment ever to have been made on the University campus.

  

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